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Thursday, July 19
 

9:00am

2:00pm

Executive Board Meeting
Thursday July 19, 2012 2:00pm - 6:00pm
Sheraton-Gardner AB
 
Friday, July 20
 

9:00am

Executive Board Meeting
Friday July 20, 2012 9:00am - 5:00pm
Sheraton-Gardner AB

12:00pm

4:00pm

6:30pm

CONELL: Dutch Treat Dinners

The Conference of Newer Law Librarians (CONELL) is held every year at the American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting and Conference. The purpose is to welcome newer AALL members, introduce them to the Association and its leaders, and provide a setting for newer members to become acquainted with each other. Attendees will have an opportunity to talk with representatives from AALL's Committees and Special Interest Sections to find out firsthand how to get involved and enjoy the benefits of Association membership, to meet new people, and have some fun.

CONELL attendees arriving on Friday, July 20, are invited to attend "Dutch Treat Dinners" at 6:30 p.m. that day. The dinners are a great way for attendees to meet each other and members of the CONELL Committee. Saturday's events start with a continental breakfast at 8:00 a.m. and the conference begins promptly at 8:30 a.m., where attendees will meet the AALL Executive Board and participate in Speed Networking and Market Place. Later that day, a fabulous lunch will be followed by speakers and additional opportunities to network with new colleagues.

Preregistration required: $100 - June 29 deadline

For questions about the CONELL program, contact a member of the Conference of Newer Law Librarians (CONELL) Committee.


Friday July 20, 2012 6:30pm - 8:30pm
OFFSITE
 
Saturday, July 21
 

7:00am

8:00am

CONELL: Check-In and Continental Breakfast

The Conference of Newer Law Librarians (CONELL) is held every year at the American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting and Conference. The purpose is to welcome newer AALL members, introduce them to the Association and its leaders, and provide a setting for newer members to become acquainted with each other. Attendees will have an opportunity to talk with representatives from AALL's Committees and Special Interest Sections to find out firsthand how to get involved and enjoy the benefits of Association membership, to meet new people, and have some fun.

CONELL attendees arriving on Friday, July 20, are invited to attend "Dutch Treat Dinners" at 6:30 p.m. that day. The dinners are a great way for attendees to meet each other and members of the CONELL Committee. Saturday's events start with a continental breakfast at 8:00 a.m. and the conference begins promptly at 8:30 a.m., where attendees will meet the AALL Executive Board and participate in Speed Networking and Market Place. Later that day, a fabulous lunch will be followed by speakers and additional opportunities to network with new colleagues.

Preregistration required: $100 - June 29 deadline

For questions about the CONELL program, contact a member of the Conference of Newer Law Librarians (CONELL) Committee.


Saturday July 21, 2012 8:00am - 8:30am
Sheraton-Republic Ballroom A

8:00am

Chapter Leadership Training (by invitation)
THIS EVENT IS BY INVITATION ONLY
Saturday July 21, 2012 8:00am - 11:30am
HCC-Room 206

8:00am

8:00am

PLL-SIS Summit III: The Path to 2020: A Vision for Change

The PLL Summit, now in its third year, continues to address issues critical to the future of law librarians and law firms. As change agents, we must ask the questions that will help us understand the fundamental changes in the business and practice of law. What will information services look like in 2020, and what should we be doing now to advance that vision? How do we empower ourselves to drive information strategies, ensuring our own viability as information professionals? In addition to a forward-looking discussion of library services, a panel of partners, including Greg Castanias, Library partner at Jones Day, will discuss the value proposition librarians bring to the table and how they see our roles evolving. Breakout sessions will cover the business of law, proactively managing your career and technological advances and challenges.

 

Participants will be better able to understand the trends, structure, and pressures of the law firm environment, so that they can be prepared to take leadership roles as the practice of law goes through a time of radical change.


In order to provide access to a wider audience, we have secured a venue that can accommodate up to 350 attendees. We encourage members to register early so they can be a part of this invaluable one-day conference.

Visit the PLL Summit blog to obtain more information as the final agenda, programs and speakers are confirmed.

Separate registration fee required - June 29 deadline

Registration fee: $145.00


Saturday July 21, 2012 8:00am - 5:00pm
Marriott-Salon F

8:00am

W2: Workshop for Newer Academic Law Library Directors

***This workshop has reached capacity.***

Target Audience: Academic law library directors with seven or fewer years of experience as a director

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will develop the skills and knowledge to succeed as newer directors.
2) Participants will develop strategies to seize opportunities and respond to challenges of their positions.

This workshop will assist law library directors, with seven or fewer years of experience as directors, to serve as effective leaders in regard to the personnel, communication, budgetary, and management issues that commonly arise in academic environments. The program also will help participants develop strategies to foster productive relationships with other institutional administrators (including deans); integrate the law library fully into the curricular and scholarly life of the law school; communicate with all critical constituencies; and lead a library during times of institutional evolution and economic constraints. Through the program sessions and structured opportunities to engage one-on-one with experienced law library directors, participants will receive knowledge and guidance in regard to designing a professional growth plan; developing a scholarly agenda; and engaging in an appropriate range and balance of professional activities. The workshop will also provide participants with knowledge and strategies related to responding to the many challenges that commonly face directors, including workload, institutional relationships, and ethical dilemmas.

You can view the workshop's schedule here.

Separate registration fee required - June 29 deadline

Registration fee includes: program, handouts, morning beverages, a boxed lunch, and an afternoon reception.

Registration fee:

AALL members: $225.00
Nonmembers: $340.00



Saturday July 21, 2012 8:00am - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 204

8:30am

SIS Leadership Training
Saturday July 21, 2012 8:30am - 11:30am
HCC-Room 201

8:30am

Legislative Advocacy Training 2012: Becoming an Effective Advocate

Law librarians, as constituents and experts in their field, play a critical role in influencing public policy at the federal and state levels. AALL’s annual Advocacy Training is designed to teach you the skills you need to successfully advocate for the information policy issues that matter to you, your library and the profession.

 

The training will feature a special guest speaker, Joseph Demers, a Massachusetts legislative staffer, who will discuss the “dos and don’ts” of effective advocacy and provide specific examples to help you get your message heard by decision-makers.

 

You’ll also have an opportunity to choose from two hands-on breakout sessions: the first, on developing best practices and strategies for promoting the Uniform Electronic Legal Material Act (UELMA) and overcoming challenges in your state; and the second on ensuring law library participation and collaboration in the future of the Federal Depository Library Program. The breakout sessions give participants the chance to brainstorm with colleagues in other states; you’ll come away with practical ideas that you can take back to your library and your community.

 

The training is sponsored by AALL’s Government Relations Office and Government Relations Committee and is available at no cost to members. To register, please contact Elizabeth Holland by June 29.

 

The Advocacy Training agenda is now available here.


Saturday July 21, 2012 8:30am - 12:30pm
HCC-Room 102

8:30am

CONELL: Welcome/Program (sponsored by Wolters Kluwer Law & Business)

The Conference of Newer Law Librarians (CONELL) is held every year at the American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting and Conference. The purpose is to welcome newer AALL members, introduce them to the Association and its leaders, and provide a setting for newer members to become acquainted with each other. Attendees will have an opportunity to talk with representatives from AALL's Committees and Special Interest Sections to find out firsthand how to get involved and enjoy the benefits of Association membership, to meet new people, and have some fun.

CONELL attendees arriving on Friday, July 20, are invited to attend "Dutch Treat Dinners" at 6:30 p.m. that day. The dinners are a great way for attendees to meet each other and members of the CONELL Committee. Saturday's events start with a continental breakfast at 8:00 a.m. and the conference begins promptly at 8:30 a.m., where attendees will meet the AALL Executive Board and participate in Speed Networking and Market Place. Later that day, a fabulous lunch will be followed by speakers and additional opportunities to network with new colleagues.

Preregistration required: $100 - June 29 deadline

For questions about the CONELL program, contact a member of the Conference of Newer Law Librarians (CONELL) Committee.


Saturday July 21, 2012 8:30am - 3:00pm
Sheraton-Republic Ballroom B

8:30am

W1: RDA for Law Catalogers

Target Audience: Experienced law catalogers and cataloging trainers whose institutions will be implementing RDA

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will learn how to access the web-based RDA Toolkit, as well as online training resources for RDA.
2) Participants will be able to apply the RDA rules for cataloging legal materials.

This workshop will explore cataloging legal materials under the new RDA rules, as well as showcase training materials developed during 2011-2012 by various AALL catalogers and trainers, staff at the Library of Congress, and members of the Program for Cooperative Cataloging (PCC). The workshop schedule will include: a brief overview of theoretical background for RDA, the differences between RDA and AACR2, how to successfully navigate the RDA Toolkit, how to apply RDA to legal materials, hands-on cataloging exercises and examples, and an introduction to available law-specific training tools for RDA.

Separate registration fee required - June 29 deadline

Registration fee includes: program, handouts, continental breakfast, and afternoon refreshments.

Registration fee:

AALL members: $175.00
Nonmembers: $265.00



Saturday July 21, 2012 8:30am - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 207

8:30am

W3: Legal Research Teaching Academy

***This workshop has reached capacity.***

Target Audience: Librarians who teach their own legal research course

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to incorporate teaching pedagogy into the design and execution of a legal research course.
2) Participants will be able to create a learning environment that maximizes student learning.

Experienced teachers will lead interactive sessions on learning styles, course and class design, creating the right classroom environment, lecturing well (including using class discussion effectively), designing and executing in-class activities, assessment of students, the role of technology in teaching, and ongoing improvement of teaching skills and style. Over the lunch break, each speaker will lead a roundtable on a teaching topic suggested by participants.

Pre-workshop readings and activities will be assigned. Because the sessions build on content presented throughout the day, participants should plan on attending the entire workshop.

Separate registration fee required


Registration fee includes: round-trip transportation between the convention center and Harvard, program, handouts, continental breakfast, a boxed lunch, and afternoon refreshments.

Registration fee:

AALL members: $95.00
Nonmembers: $145.00

AALL gratefully acknowledges Harvard Law School Library for hosting this workshop.



Saturday July 21, 2012 8:30am - 5:00pm
OFFSITE-Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall (Room 3018)

8:30am

W4: Going Mobile: Building Mobile Applications

***This workshop has reached capacity.***

Target Audience: Reference librarians, electronic services/resources librarians, IT librarians and emerging technology librarians with a strong understanding of HTML/HTML5, CSS and introductory level JavaScript knowledge who are interested in building mobile applications for their library

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will discover the tools to design and produce mobile applications for their library services.
2) Participants will be able to build a simple mobile application with development tools designed for individuals with varying levels of programming experience.

Within five years, mobile web access will overtake desktop web access. Vendors like Westlaw and Fastcase reach customers through mobile applications. Libraries around the world are developing applications to reach their patrons: building mobile-friendly websites, OPACs, digital collections, and tour guides. You can, too! This workshop will provide experience designing and building mobile applications and interfaces for library services, including native and non-native apps. Speakers will discuss and evaluate mobile applications for different library uses. They will compare design strategies and application creation tools like HTML5, iwebkit, Zoho, and Conduit. During hands-on breakout sessions, speakers will provide instruction and guidance as participants test their skills designing different types of applications.

While computers in the lab will be available for attendee use, attendees are encouraged to bring their own laptops so they can easily take their work product home.

Separate registration fee required - June 29 deadline

Registration fee includes: round-trip transportation between the convention center and Harvard, program, handouts, continental breakfast, a boxed lunch, and afternoon refreshments.

Registration fee:

AALL members: $95.00
Nonmembers: $145.00

AALL gratefully acknowledges Harvard Law School Library for hosting this workshop.



Saturday July 21, 2012 8:30am - 5:00pm
OFFSITE-Harvard Law School Library, Computer Lab

9:00am

AALLNET Committee Webmaster's Workshop
THIS EVENT IS BY INVITATION ONLY
Saturday July 21, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
HCC-Room 101

9:00am

Daily Paper-The Hub

The Hub, AALL’s daily conference paper, will help keep you informed during the 2012 Annual Meeting. Published for the four days of the conference (Saturday–Tuesday) in print—plus two electronic editions—it will feature articles of interest to those attending the meeting, including program and meeting announcements, articles about featured speakers, and helpful advice from selected librarians from around the country. Also featured will be information about the Boston area, including articles on historical sites, cultural events, tours, and dining.

Be sure to check our blog The Hub-Bub regularly, too, for news and updates about conference happenings in our host city.

Interested persons wishing to submit articles or other information to the Hub should send them to Joan Shear at Boston College Law Library.

• Articles for the electronic preview edition must be received by June 7.
• Articles for the first print edition must be received by July 9.
• Onsite, the deadline is 1:00 p.m. for the next day's edition.


Saturday July 21, 2012 9:00am - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 209

10:00am

11:45am

12:00pm

Complete Tour of Boston

Discover the charm of one of America's oldest and most historic cities. With almost 400 years of history, you’ll experience Boston’s old and new. Neighborhoods your visit may include:

Beacon Hill: Boston's most prestigious address and home to the gold-domed State House, overlooking Boston Common and the Public Garden. Also view the famous Swan Boats. Beacon Hill has been home to many notable Americans.

Back Bay: The neighborhood gained its name because the area was, before extensive landfilling in the 19th Century, literally the "Back Bay" for Boston. Now the area is known for an upscale residential, retail, and commercial office district.

Downtown: Boston's center of business and government and home to one of Boston's most historic sites such as Faneuil Hall. Downtown also serves as a sanctuary for shoppers, offering everything from large department stores to cozy boutiques.

North End: Home to American patriot Paul Revere, the North End is one of Boston's most historic neighborhoods. Traditionally a first stop for immigrants arriving in Boston, the North End is most well known as an enclave of Italian immigrants.

Charlestown: As the home to such significant landmarks as the U.S.S. Constitution, the Bunker Hill Monument and the Navy Yard, Charlestown's allure has enticed a new generation of immigrants and young professionals to join its traditionally Irish-American population.

Fenway/Kenmore: Perhaps most recognized as the home of Fenway Park and the Boston Red Sox, Fenway/Kenmore also boasts many of the City's top cultural institutions, including the Museum of Fine Arts and Symphony Hall. Fenway/Kenmore also has a strong academic presence.

Saturday, July 21
Approximate Timing: 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Cost: $39.00 per person, based on (25) guests  - Book this tour

Included Features: Roundtrip transportation via Mini coach, professional guide service,
and all admissions & taxes
 
*This tour involves a considerable amount of walking on hills and cobblestones however can be customized to fit your group’s requests. Participants should be aware of these conditions and are advised to wear walking shoes.


Saturday July 21, 2012 12:00pm - 4:00pm
Boston

12:00pm

Placement Office

The AALL Placement Committee is proud to offer online job and candidate searching as part of the Placement Office at the AALL Annual Meeting and Conference in Boston. Posting through the AALL Career Center offers many benefits to employers and job seekers. Best of all, you don't have to be in Boston for the AALL Conference, and you don't even have to be in the Placement Office to take part in the action!

http://www.aallnet.org/conference/more/placement-services


Saturday July 21, 2012 12:00pm - 5:00pm
Sheraton-The Fens

1:00pm

1:30pm

1:30pm

Committee Leadership Training (by invitation)
THIS EVENT IS BY INVITATION ONLY
Saturday July 21, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm
HCC-Room 208

1:30pm

SIS Council Meeting
Saturday July 21, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm
HCC-Room 201

1:30pm

3:00pm

3:00pm

3:00pm

3:00pm

3:00pm

3:00pm

3:00pm

3:00pm

3:00pm

3:00pm

3:00pm

Nominations Committee Orientation/Meeting (by invitation)
THIS EVENT IS BY INVITATION ONLY
Saturday July 21, 2012 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Sheraton-Dalton A

3:00pm

3:00pm

3:00pm

3:00pm

4:00pm

4:00pm

4:00pm

4:00pm

4:00pm

4:00pm

4:00pm

4:00pm

4:00pm

4:00pm

5:00pm

Exhibit Hall Ribbon Cutting/Opening Reception

This year’s Meeting in Boston will kick off with a ribbon-cutting to open the Exhibit Hall, followed by an Opening Reception on the exhibit hall floor. This light hors d’oeuvres and cocktail reception, featuring local favorites, will allow attendees to gather to network and visit exhibitors without scheduling conflicts and will allow plenty of time for dine-arounds and receptions to follow.

Attendees purchasing a Conference or Per-Day (Saturday) Registration will receive a ticket to this event; additional guest tickets are available for purchase.

See who's exhibiting...


Saturday July 21, 2012 5:00pm - 6:30pm
HCC-Exhibit Hall-Level 2

5:30pm

AALL Award Winners Photo Session

All of our AALL award winners will be recognized during the opening reception with a photo with AALL President Darcy Kirk. 


Saturday July 21, 2012 5:30pm - 6:30pm
HCC-Exhibit Hall/Member Services Booth

6:45pm

7:00pm

7:00pm

7:00pm

7:00pm

PLL-Fastcase Hospitality Suite

Please come relax and network with your colleagues and enjoy a morning coffee and danish, afternoon snacks, light hors d'oeuvres or a nightcap from 7am – 11:00pm in the Fenway Suite # 2807.


Saturday July 21, 2012 7:00pm - 11:59pm
Sheraton-Fenway Suite (Room 2807)

7:10pm

Boston Red Sox Game

Enjoy a Red Sox game at America's most beloved stadium - Fenway Park.
Your senses will light up as you step onto Yawkee Way and catch a smell of a “Fenway frank,” hear the cheers of the most dedicated fans, and see the most authentic stadium in America. Visit the home of the 2004 and 2007 World Champion Red Sox team as they battle it out with their opponent. This is the park where the Babe pitched, the Kid hit, Yaz dazzled, and famed players such as “Big Papi” Ortiz still thrill young fans today. Soak up the rich history, hear the echoes of the past and get a glimpse of the Green Monster. Throughout the duration of the game your guests have the opportunity to shop in a licensed Red Sox gift shop for authentic Red Sox souvenirs right in the Park and on Yawkee Way. Enjoy the excitement and intensity of a Boston Red Sox evening game!!

Saturday, July 21
Tickets for Boston Red Sox vs. Toronto Blue Jays Baseball Game
Start Time: 7:10 p.m.

Bleacher 41, Row 43, 4 seats @ $91.00 each
Bleacher 41, Row 44, 23 seats @ $91.00 each
Bleacher 41, Row 45, 23 seats @ $91.00 each

Shipping: $15.00

Total Cost: $91.30 per person, based on (50) guests - Book this tour


Saturday July 21, 2012 7:10pm - 10:00pm
Fenway Park

7:30pm

University of Washington Law Librarianship Alumni and Friends Reunion Dinner
THIS EVENT IS BY INVITATION ONLY
Saturday July 21, 2012 7:30pm - 10:30pm
OFFSITE-Rattlesnake Bar and Grill 384 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02116

9:00pm

9:00pm

CS-SIS Karaoke with Ken

CS-SIS invites you to join us again for the premier AALL karaoke outing!  This year's venue will be Elephant & Castle Pub and Restaurant, 161 Devonshire Street, inside the Club Quarters Hotel. We'll gather in the lobby of the Sheraton Boston (HQ hotel) on Saturday, July 21, at 9:00 PM, and then head over to the pub.  We have a group reservation for 9:30.  If you need to come later, e.g., those going to watch the game at Fenway Park,  just meet us at the pub.

 

Travel options include a cab from the hotel, the T Green Line from Prudential Station to Park Street, or walking the 2 miles for the more adventurous.

 

Please come along for an evening of music and fun!


Saturday July 21, 2012 9:00pm - 11:59pm
Elephant & Castle Pub and Restaurant 161 Devonshire Street, Boston, MA 02110
 
Sunday, July 22
 

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

ALL-SIS Breakfast and Business Meeting (sponsored by Thomson Reuters)

There is no charge for this ticketed event, but advance registration by June 29 is required.


Sunday July 22, 2012 7:00am - 8:30am
Sheraton-Republic Ballroom B

7:00am

7:00am

SCCLL-SIS Breakfast, Business Meeting and Silent Auction (sponsored by LexisNexis)

Ticketed event: $30.00; advance registration required by June 29.


Sunday July 22, 2012 7:00am - 8:30am
Sheraton-Independence Ballroom West

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

PLL-Fastcase Hospitality Suite

Please come relax and network with your colleagues and enjoy a morning coffee and danish, afternoon snacks, light hors d'oeuvres or a nightcap from 7am – 11:00pm in the Fenway Suite # 2807.


Sunday July 22, 2012 7:00am - 11:59pm
Sheraton-Fenway Suite (Room 2807)

8:45am

Opening General Session/Keynote Speaker (sponsored by Bloomberg Law/Bloomberg BNA, LexisNexis and Wolters Kluwer Law & Business)

This session will be webcast from Boston on AALL2go (member login required).

Tomorrow's Legal Marketplace

 

What future role will lawyers and legal information professionals play in an IT-based information society? Suggesting that the global recession has brought about an irreversible change to the legal market – one that will define the next decade of legal service – Richard Susskind will explain why and how some (but not all) legal services will become commoditized. Susskind will introduce two concepts – decomposing and multi-sourcing – that he believes will underpin the work of tomorrow’s lawyers. He will then explore the role that information technology and the internet will play in transforming legal service, improving our courts, and improving access to justice. Susskind argues that these transformations present a fundamental challenge for everyone who works in the legal marketplace.  Tomorrow’s legal marketplace will be very different from today’s, leading Susskind to pose two questions: 1) What are we training our young lawyers to become? and 2) What jobs will there be for legal professionals in the future? In answering this last question, Susskind will outline a series of exciting  new job opportunities for legal information professionals.

 

Professor Richard Susskind, OBE, is an author, speaker, and independent adviser to major professional firms, in-house legal departments, and national governments. His main area of expertise is the future of legal service, with particular reference to information technology. Since 1988, he has been IT Adviser to the Lord Chief Justice of England of Wales. He is President of the Society for Computers and Law and Chair of the Advisory Board of the Oxford University Internet Institute. He holds professorships at Oxford University; University College, London; Gresham College, London; and the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow.  Richard lectures internationally and has been invited to speak in more than 40 countries and has addressed audiences (in person and electronically), numbering more than 250,000. He has written and edited numerous books, including Expert Systems in Law (OUP, 1987), The Future of Law (OUP, 1996), Transforming the Law (OUP, 2000), The End of Lawyers? (OUP, 2008), Tomorrow’s Lawyers (OUP, forthcoming). He has written well over 100 columns for The Times, and his work has been translated into 10 languages. Richard has a law degree from the University of Glasgow and a doctorate in law and computers from Balliol College, Oxford. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and of the British Computer Society, and was awarded an OBE in the Millennium New Year's Honours List for services to IT in the Law and to the Administration of Justice.


Organizers/Presenters

Sunday July 22, 2012 8:45am - 10:15am
HCC-Ballroom

9:00am

Daily Paper-The Hub

The Hub, AALL’s daily conference paper, will help keep you informed during the 2012 Annual Meeting. Published for the four days of the conference (Saturday–Tuesday) in print—plus two electronic editions—it will feature articles of interest to those attending the meeting, including program and meeting announcements, articles about featured speakers, and helpful advice from selected librarians from around the country. Also featured will be information about the Boston area, including articles on historical sites, cultural events, tours, and dining.

Be sure to check our blog The Hub-Bub regularly, too, for news and updates about conference happenings in our host city.

Interested persons wishing to submit articles or other information to the Hub should send them to Joan Shear at Boston College Law Library.

• Articles for the electronic preview edition must be received by June 7.
• Articles for the first print edition must be received by July 9.
• Onsite, the deadline is 1:00 p.m. for the next day's edition.


Sunday July 22, 2012 9:00am - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 209

9:00am

Placement Office

The AALL Placement Committee is proud to offer online job and candidate searching as part of the Placement Office at the AALL Annual Meeting and Conference in Boston. Posting through the AALL Career Center offers many benefits to employers and job seekers. Best of all, you don't have to be in Boston for the AALL Conference, and you don't even have to be in the Placement Office to take part in the action!

http://www.aallnet.org/conference/more/placement-services


Sunday July 22, 2012 9:00am - 5:00pm
Sheraton-The Fens

10:00am

10:45am

A1: Patriot Practice: Programs to Assist Service Members and Veterans

Target Audience: Law librarians interested in providing services to military members and veterans

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to articulate anecdotal and statistical indicators of the need for legal assistance for military service members and veterans.
2) Participants will be able to summarize three means of support that law librarians can provide to address the needs of service members and veterans.

While a growing number of service members are returning home, many of those still deployed abroad continue to serve despite intensifying legal issues at home. Additionally, because of the increasing number of veterans returning home with medical and other significant needs, veterans are finding it more difficult to successfully assert claims for medical and other types of assistance. Further, criminal courts are seeing an increasing number of cases involving veterans. The American Bar Association, state bar associations, and academic institutions are implementing programs to provide legal assistance to service members and veterans. This program will attempt to describe the scope of the need and familiarize participants with some of the program initiatives and resources designed to help address the legal needs of service members and veterans. The panel members will also discuss how law librarians can support these programs.



Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 210

10:45am

A2: The National Declassification Center – Will It Meet Our Expectations?

Target Audience: Law librarians from all types of libraries whose patrons need access to declassified records for their research

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify five challenges related to the federal government’s declassification policy and assess the effectiveness of the National Declassification Center in addressing these challenges.
2) Participants will be able to list effective strategies for locating and making use of newly declassified records to benefit their library users and contribute to a more open government.

The National Declassification Center (NDC), established by Executive Order in late 2009, has the vital task of preparing a revised backlog of approximately 385 million pages for public release by December 31, 2013. Many of these records are of great interest to legal researchers. NDC Director Sheryl Jasielum Shenberger will discuss the progress the NDC has made in addressing this growing backlog and prioritizing records for release, as well as the challenges that remain. Nate Jones, FOIA Coordinator for the National Security Archive, will assess the progress that the NDC has made from an outsider’s perspective, and Catherine Dunn, Government Relations Committee Chair and moderator of this session, will outline the sources available for accessing declassified documents and discuss how researchers can use them effectively.



Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 306

10:45am

A3: Guerrilla Usability Testing

Target Audience: Librarians interested in improving their services

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify problems users have working with web-based interfaces.
2) Participants will be able to implement a cost-effective usability program.

How can you design systems that work efficiently, while avoiding common problems? Enter usability testing, a process to observe user interaction with a system intended to discover and fix problems. Contrary to popular belief, usability testing need not be expensive or even overly time consuming. This program will demonstrate different types of usability testing, including sophisticated software tools and low-tech solutions; discuss the “test early and often” model of usability testing; and show how to budget time and money for a successful usability testing program. Participants will also see a live usability test conducted during this program.



Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 302

10:45am

A4: E-stats Collection for Your Non-Stacks Collection

Target Audience: Reference and acquisitions librarians, electronic services librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will become knowledgeable about usage statistics and how to gather them.
2) Participants will have the ability to analyze third-party aggregators and ERM integration.

Library analytics have become more important than ever in the electronic era. As budgets tighten and students demand more online resources, evaluating usage of such resources becomes a key issue in allocating expense funds. Statistical analysis is one way to determine whether a library is getting its best bang for the buck. However, obtaining and analyzing such statistics can be a scattered and challenging process. Speakers will discuss the ways libraries obtain patron usage statistics with a central focus on electronic resources. Participants will see demonstrations of third-party statistical gathering software, as well as learn how to gain access to statistics held and distributed directly by vendors. An overview of COUNTER and SUSHI compliance will also be presented.


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Ian Connor

Ian Connor

Senior Director of Engineering | | Copyright Clearance Center | | | | Pubget, a wholly owned subsidiary of Copyright Clearance Center Inc, is the premier provider of search and documents in the sciences. Learn how our advertising programs, enterprise solutions, and library solutions can help you make more money and be more efficient. | | | | Pubget PaperStats securely tracks COUNTER-compliant usage statistics, so... Read More →
avatar for Sujay Darji

Sujay Darji

Product Manager, Swets
I am a Product Manager at Swets for North and South America. I have a strong interest in content usage and the tools we have developed to help assisting in selection management. | | | | Outside of Swets I have many hobbies that include Hockey, Fishing, Computer gaming, Motorcycles among other miscellaneous items when I am able to scrounge up some time. I am have been happily married to my wonderful wife Michelle since November of... Read More →


Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 304

10:45am

A5: Be Memorable: Library Advocacy Through Compelling Storytelling

Target Audience: All librarians who are interested in developing strong advocacy skills

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will identify the elements of an effective, purposeful story and will be able to create such stories.
2) Participants will be able to incorporate storytelling within their advocacy efforts.

Whether persuading an administrator within your institution or lobbying for external action, storytelling can be a powerful and compelling advocacy tool. Telling stories about real people and real challenges is an effective means for convincing others of your viewpoint. What makes a good story? How can you incorporate the elements of storytelling into your advocacy efforts? After learning the fundamentals of a persuasive story and how to successfully integrate the story within a strategic advocacy campaign, participants will have the opportunity to practice their newly acquired skills in small groups. Volunteers from the small groups will share their story drafts with the larger audience and receive constructive feedback.


Organizers/Presenters
JT

Jason Tubinis

IT Librarian, University of Georgia School of Law


Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 312

10:45am

A6: The New FDLP: A Collaborative Future for Government Information

Target Audience: Public services staff in all types of law libraries

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will gain a better understanding of the future of the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP) in a digital world.
2) Participants will learn what options are available as libraries collaborate to provide regional FDLP sites (services).

This program will examine the future of the Federal Depository Library Program, now that the old print model of distribution is largely a thing of the past. How is the Government Printing Office adjusting to the new world of digital information?


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Arlene Weible

Arlene Weible

Oregon State Library
I am the Electronic Resources Consultant and Federal Regional Depository Coordinator at the Oregon State Library. Please talk to me about the Statewide Database Licensing Program, the Federal Depository Library Program, or if you just want to figure out what is happening at the State Library!


Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 311

10:45am

FCIL-SIS Program: Teaching Foreign and International Law Interest Group Presents, "Teaching FCIL Topics Roundtable"

Target Audience: Librarians who teach in law schools or train lawyers in law firms

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will identify effective strategies for teaching research on foreign legal databases.
2) Participants will discuss pedagogical techniques that help digital generation students learn.

Come take advantage of an opportunity to share your experiences and learn about new techniques used in teaching foreign, comparative, and international legal research courses. Breakout sessions are planned based on audience interests and institutions.


Organizers/Presenters

Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Sheraton-Independence Ballroom East

10:45am

PLL-SIS Program: Bloom Where You’re Planted: Finding Contentment at Work

Target Audience: All librarians, regardless of library type

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will gain new insights into how to be content in situations that can be difficult.

2) Participants will learn strategies and techniques for relaxation and making the best of difficult work situations.

Everyone – even those who love the work they do – can have difficult work situations.  This may be a temporary situation, or it may be something that is long-term and beyond your control.  Instead of quitting or getting stressed and angry, come to this session and learn strategies for coping with challenging situations.  You will also have the opportunity to participate in a facilitated relaxation exercise and share your own strategies with colleagues during the discussion portion of the program.


Organizers/Presenters

Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 202

10:45am

RIPS-SIS Program: Medical Marijuana: A Growing Concern?

Target Audience: Researchers interested in gaining an understanding of the complicated and controversial laws governing medical marijuana

Learning outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify sources of law governing the access to and growth of medical marijuana.
2) Participants will be able to help their patrons weed through the legal issues surrounding medical marijuana.

The legalities of medical marijuana is a fascinating example of state and federal laws at war. Although 15 states have legalized marijuana for medical purposes, the drug remains a banned substance under federal law, raising issues of Congress's pre-emption authority under the Supremacy clause. To further befuddle researchers, state laws often involve a complicated quagmire of referenda, statutes, regulations, ordinances, and judicial opinions. This program delves into the conflict between the federal government’s enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act, and state and local laws underscoring the therapeutic benefits of cannabis. The speakers will also address practical concerns surrounding lawful access to medical marijuana. Whether the medicinal use of marijuana is ultimately slated for eradication, or achieves legalization, this presentation will challenge you to take a fresh look at this complex and rapidly changing area of law.


Organizers/Presenters

Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 205

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

PLL-SIS Annual Business Meeting Luncheon (sponsored by LexisNexis)

Ticketed event: $10.00; advance registration required by June 29.


Sunday July 22, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Sheraton-Constitution Ballroom

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

WestPac Luncheon
Sunday July 22, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
OFFSITE-Legal Sea Foods 800 Boylston St # 103 Boston, MA 02199

12:00pm

12:00pm

LHRB-SIS Program: Morris Cohen Student Essay Contest Presentation

Target Audience: Librarians interested in legal history

 

Learning Outcomes

1) Participants will be able to identify three professional needs of 19th-century American legal practitioners.
2) Participants will be able to discuss how the content of an early legal journal empirically reflects and addresses historical legal professional interests and needs.

 

Zoey Orol will present "Reading the Early American Legal Profession:  A Study of the First American Law Review."  Orol is the second-place winner of the 2012 Morris Cohen Student Essay Contest and a 2L student at New York University School of Law.  John Beerbower, a 3L student at the University of Virginia School of Law, wrote the first-place essay.  His essay, "Ex Parte McCardle and the Attorney General's Duty to Defend Acts of Congress," examines key historical antecedents of Attorneys General refusals to defend a statute or appear on behalf of the United States in cases before the Supreme Court.  (Beerbower is unable to attend the AALL Annual Meeting.)  These excellent papers demonstrate the continuing importance of historical research to understanding the foundations and development of legal theory and practice.  The LHRB-SIS annual essay contest is named in honor of Morris L. Cohen, former Professor Emeritus of Law at Yale Law School, whose scholarly work was in the fields of legal research, rare books, and historical bibliography.  The purpose of the contest is to encourage scholarship in the areas of legal history, rare law books, and legal archives, as well as to acquaint students with the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and law librarianship.  Additional information on the Morris Cohen Student Essay Contest is available on the LHRB SIS website.


Organizers/Presenters

Sunday July 22, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
HCC-Room 203

1:15pm

B1: The New Generation of Legal Research Databases: 2012 Boston Sequel

Target Audience: Anyone who uses multiple online legal research vendors in their normal workflow

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to assess the advantages and disadvantages of newer generation vendor engines over classic versions of Bloomberg Law, LexisNexis, and Westlaw.
2) Participants will be able to discuss how the adoption of these new versions of standard research tools affects the education of end users and workflows in libraries.

What began as a lively discussion of WestlawNext last year in Philadelphia continues with this sequel program. This forum will enable librarians familiar with Bloomberg Law, LexisNexis Advance, and WestlawNext to compare the developments of these research tools and consider the effect these changes have had in libraries. The discussion will contrast the latest interfaces of these services to their classic versions, as well as to each other. What worked? What failed? Have these “improvements” changed the workflow at your institution or company? Did these changes impact user preference? And, how can vendors improve future product generations? Practical matters – such as implementation, user education, accuracy of results, document sharing, billing practices, and user satisfaction – will dominate the discussion.


Organizers/Presenters
EM

Emily Marcum

I'm a law firm librarian from Birmingham, Alabama. Our firm has 61 attorneys.
VJ

Victoria J. Szymczak

Law Library Director, Associate Professor of Law, William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawaii at Manoa


Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 302

1:15pm

B2: Finding the Future: Position Your Organization for Long-Term Viability

Target Audience: Law librarians in all organizations who are asked to provide strategic information for their own or parent organization

Learning Outcomes:
1) Law librarians in all organizations will be able to immediately use the information presented to enhance the strategic knowledge-base of their own or parent organization, and thereby, make a measurable contribution to the future.
2) Participants will be introduced to the basics of two, strategically focused skills – environmental scanning and trend analysis – to augment their own professional skill set.

Environmental scanning and trend analysis are two techniques that are used regularly in any number of settings to help organizations plan for and position themselves for the future. Law firms might use these techniques to anticipate client demand for their services. Law schools may need to prepare for curricula changes. Governmental bodies may be faced with regulatory or reporting requirements. All libraries are constantly challenged to anticipate changes in collections, services, staffing, and technology. By providing actual examples and demonstrating the use of proven techniques, this program will show how law firms, law schools, and government libraries can leverage environmental scanning and trend analysis to position their parent organizations, and themselves, for long-term viability. Drawing upon their own expertise and experience, the panelists will individually describe their own findings and methodologies, and then engage the audience in a discussion of best practices and information-gathering techniques that are common to the kinds of organizations represented and have contributed to organizations’ strategic decision-making.



Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 304

1:15pm

B3: Digital Content: The What, the How, and the Where

Target Audience: Law librarians interested in planning and conducting a digitization project

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to create a digitization policy for their libraries.
2) Participants will learn how to identify sources of costs in projects and in archiving digital content, considering in-house or outsourcing options.

This program will cover the basics of creating digital products, including best practices, specifications, metadata, workflow, quality control and assessment, and vendor relations. Additionally, participants will learn how to manage digital content, including making the content available for users, assessing user needs, ingest of content, access issues for digital content management, preservation options, and digital repositories. This program is co-sponsored by the Legal Information Preservation Alliance (LIPA).



Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 210

1:15pm

B4: Piercing the Veil of Sovereignty: The Sources of International Human Rights Law – Part I

Target Audience: Academic, government, and court reference and collection development librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to analyze a research problem in terms of the legal system, the human rights issue, and the appropriate treaty.
2) Participants will be able to identify and apply the knowledge of the appropriate institutional source; the stage in the institution’s process at which the relevant information/document is likely to be found; and the type of document that is most likely to have the information needed to solve the problem.

Part I of this program will teach participants the advanced skills they need to research difficult problems in the United Nations Charter-based and treaty-based bodies. Presenters will use examples of violations of human rights law and the institutional responses to them to illuminate the characteristics of the treaties; the enigmatic organization and procedures of the institutions created by the Charter and the treaties; and the unique documents produced by those institutions. Participants will return to their institutions able to solve research problems that they could not have previously addressed.



Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 312

1:15pm

B5: How Fair Is It? Understanding the Fair Sentencing Act of 2010

Target Audience: Information professionals in law schools, government libraries, prison libraries

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to track the history of the Anti-Abuse Act of 1986, which created the disparity between U.S. federal criminal penalties for crack cocaine and powder cocaine, to the recently passed Fair Sentencing Act of 2010, which reduces that disparity.
2) Participants will be able to analyze the potential impact that the new legislation is expected to have in predominately low-income, African-American communities.

Since the late 1980s, increasingly more severe sentencing has been applied to the possession or distribution of crack cocaine, which is more often associated with low-income, African-American communities. However, while African-American defendants account for roughly 80 percent of those arrested and jailed for crack-related offenses, public health data reveals that two-thirds of crack cocaine users are more likely to be white or Hispanic. For a first-time trafficking offense involving five grams or more of crack cocaine, or 500 grams or more of powder cocaine, the statutory penalty range was five to 40 years of imprisonment. The Fair Sentencing Act of 2010 set out to reduce the racial disparity in sentencing for crack cocaine versus powder cocaine. Attendees will discover the motivation behind the original legislation that created the sentencing disparity and the implications of the new legislation for low-income, African-American communities.



Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 306

1:15pm

B6: Finding Your Inner Nancy Drew: Public Records Resources Online

Target Audience: Reference librarians in all libraries who need to research people or companies

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify and utilize the best and most cost-effective online resources for their public records research.
2) Participants will be prepared to analyze and evaluate public records databases and their content.

Looking for information on a person or company? This program will cover sites and strategies useful in public records research. Participants will learn creative ways to use (mostly) free web sites to find location and real property data, birth/death and marriage/divorce records, company affiliations, professional licenses, court records, and more. Additional discussion will cover public records databases and how to critically evaluate the information. The speakers each have more than a decade of experience in conducting research on people and companies, and will provide concrete examples and strategies used in their work.


Organizers/Presenters

Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 311

1:15pm

OBS-SIS Program: Who Wants to Be an Acronymaire? The New Game Show for Law Librarians

Target Audience: Librarians, especially those in public service or reference arenas, who get confused by all the acronyms that have arisen in the library world – notably in the area of technology

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify different technologies by their acronyms and will leave knowing more acronyms than they knew before.
2) Participants will be able to more readily recognize and explain the meaning of various library and library technology-related acronyms.

FRSAD? RDA? FRAD? BSR? NACO? Acronyms are everywhere in our profession. New ones arrive all the time, and you are supposed to know what they mean. Are you an "Acronym Whiz," or do you go running whenever they appear? Well, here’s your chance to test your mettle by participating in this new game – "Who Wants to Be an Acronymaire?!" Not good at playing games? No problem! Simply sit in our audience and cheer for your favorite contestant. Everyone gets a prize -- becoming an expert on what all those acronyms mean. Then when you return to work, you can host your very own, “Who Wants to Be an Acronymaire?!”


Organizers/Presenters

Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 206

1:15pm

PLL-SIS Program: Driving Utilization and Firm Profitability Through Resource Customization

Target Audience: Law firm librarians who want information on utilizing technology to integrate resources into their online portal

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will learn the different types of technology available for integrating resources and offering customized services within their online environment.
2) Participants will be able to create a strategy for increasing resource utilization and firm profitability through portal and dashboard enhancements.

This program will highlight the types of technology and resources that law librarians and knowledge professionals use to provide access to internal and external information that directly aligns with their firm’s strategic initiatives. The presenters will discuss application programming interfaces (APIs), custom user interfaces (CUIs), widgets, dashboards, and other technology currently available in the legal market. Also, see how both law firm libraries and knowledge management departments are embracing SharePoint and other software to create more customization. Learn how you can offer customized access points to content that will drive resource utilization and deliver value to your firm in new and innovative ways.



Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 207

1:30pm

TS-SIS Program: Creating Legal Subject Headings

Target Audience: Librarians who want to improve Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), but do not know how

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to complete a subject heading proposal form accurately.
2) Participants will know the criteria used in evaluating Subject Authority Cooperative Program (SACO) heading proposals.


The Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) will grow and evolve only if librarians take an active role in its curation. Through hands-on practice, participants will work together to conceive, compose, evaluate, and submit a draft proposal for SACO of the Program for Cooperative Cataloging (PCC), the editorial body that ultimately adds and changes terms in LCSH, via the TS-SIS Law Funnel. This program will involve participants in the kinds of discussions in which the LCSH editorial board engages.



Sunday July 22, 2012 1:30pm - 2:30pm
HCC-Room 202

2:45pm

3:45pm

C1: Searching Legal Opinions: The Google Scholar Approach

Target Audience: Technical services librarians, public services librarians, information system managers, database managers, library directors

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will tour the key features of Google Scholar’s search service for legal opinions and journals.
2) Participants will discover indexing problems with legal collections and the approaches Google Scholar has adopted to solve those problems.

Google Scholar has recently implemented an extensive database of U.S. case law. Legal professionals, law students, and other users can find and read the decisions that govern their lives. Google Scholar is not only used by students, faculty, librarians, and researchers, it is also used by professionals in many large law firms. For the first time, one of the founding engineers of Google Scholar, Dr. Anurag Acharya, will join AALL to share the approaches taken to meet the challenges of legal materials. Dr. Acharya will present Google Scholar’s search service for legal materials, describing and illustrating key features. He will also explain how Google approaches problems specific to indexing legal collections. The program will conclude with a 30-minute question-and-answer session.


Organizers/Presenters
AA

Anurag Acharya

Co-creator, Google Scholar
Anurag Acharya is a Distinguished Engineer at Google. He is one of the founders of Google Scholar. Previously, he led the indexing group at Google. He has a Bachelors in Computer Science from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur and a PhD in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon. Prior to joining Google, he was a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Maryland, College Park and an assistant professor at the University of... Read More →


Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 210

3:45pm

C2: Launching into RDA: The New Frontier

Target Audience: Technical services librarians, administrators

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will benefit from hearing about other law librarians’ real-life experiences with RDA and will learn how to successfully implement Resource Description Access (RDA) in their libraries.
2) Participants will be able to assess the impact of RDA implementation on their online library catalogs.

Three U.S. national libraries are expected to implement the new cataloging code, RDA, beginning January 2013. Law catalogers who participated in the RDA testing process and training during the fall of 2010 and the spring of 2011 described their experiences at “The TS-SIS Hot Topic program: The RDA Decision and What It Means for Me and My Library!” in Philadelphia in 2011. The two law libraries represented at that program have decided to implement RDA well before the U.S. national libraries do so. Law catalogers from those libraries will share their experiences transitioning from AACR2 to RDA, and discuss the impact on workflow, productivity, OPAC displays, and information retrieval.


Organizers/Presenters
IG

Ismael Gullon

Associate Law Librarian, Mercer University Law School


Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 306

3:45pm

C3: Law Library Collections Post-Microform: Future Implications for the Newest Legacy Format

Target Audience: Law librarians interested in microform collection management and access

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to describe the current status of microform-produced, law-related materials and the availability of microform equipment.
2) Participants will be able to compare options for managing and accessing microform collections.

For nearly a century, microform has provided compact storage of non-binary, human-readable information, allowing libraries to efficiently and effectively increase their collection size and variety of topical content. Recently, the production of microform and microform reading equipment has plummeted, but the quality of digitization from microform has vastly improved. Microform is becoming a legacy format, and libraries must decide what to do with their collections. This program will examine the current status of the production of law-related materials on microform, availability of microform equipment, and digitization of existing law-related microform materials. Additional discussion will cover the options for managing microform collections, as well as access to print and microform-based information in the next decade, including storage and preservation, scanning and digitization equipment, access methodologies, and user services.



Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 302

3:45pm

C4: Piercing the Veil of Sovereignty: The Sources of International Human Rights Law – Part II

Target Audience: Academic, government, and court reference and collection development librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to analyze a research problem in terms of the legal system, the human rights issue, and the appropriate treaty.

2) Participants will be able to identify and apply the knowledge of the appropriate institutional source, the stage in the institution’s process at which the relevant information/document is likely to be found, and the type of document that is most likely to have the information needed to solve the problem.


Part II of this program will teach participants the advanced skills they need to do research on difficult problems in the Council of Europe, the European Court of Human Rights, and the Inter-American Human Rights Commission and Court. Presenters will use examples of violations of human rights law and the institutional responses to them to illuminate the characteristics of the European and American Human Rights agreements; the enigmatic organization and procedures of the institutions created by the those treaties; and the unique documents that they produce. Upon returning to their institutions, participants will be able to solve research problems that they could not have previously addressed.


Organizers/Presenters

Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 312

3:45pm

C5: Hot Topics in Copyright for Librarians

Target Audience: All librarians who deal with copyright issues

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will be able to explain their obligations and opportunities for using copyrighted materials.

2) Participants will be able to identify high-priority copyright issues at the federal and state levels that impact law librarians.

Law librarians are often the go-to professionals for copyright issues and questions.  Whether we are evaluating the copyright issues of documents we need to use, seeking permissions, determining fair use, applying the Section 108 copyright exemption for libraries, or just answering everybody’s question of “Can I copy/scan/email/post/route this?”, copyright impacts our professional lives on a day-to-day basis.  The digital revolution has complicated copyright by allowing forms of copying and distribution that were unheard of in the analog era.  Keeping up with this ever-changing world is a particular challenge.

In a unique format, the Copyright Committee is presenting a series of short presentations on three hot topics in the copyright world.  The first will focus on locating owners of copyrighted materials.  A law librarian and practicing attorney will provide tips and suggestions for locating elusive owners of copyrighted “orphan” works.  The second presentation will look at copyright coverage of state and local government documents.  While virtually all federal documents are in the public domain under 17 USC Section 105, this federal law does not apply to the states, leaving states with various approaches.  Speakers will highlight the skills for determining if a particular state document may be covered by a copyright.  The final presentation will look at the most recent developments in copyright legislation and litigation, including the ongoing Google Books and Georgia State University lawsuits, recent suits claiming copyright protection for court briefs and “prior art” in patent claims, and the latest in the copyright piracy (SOPA) debate in Congress.



Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 311

3:45pm

C6: Attorney-Client Confidentiality and the Law Librarian

Target Audience: Librarians who support attorneys, comply with privacy laws, do licensing, and provide reference; IT staff

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will learn about attorney-client confidentiality requirements relating to legal research.
2) Participants will be able to apply confidentiality compliance techniques to licensing, reference, and some IT support for attorneys and judges, as well as clinical law faculty and students.

Attorney-client confidentiality is challenged by cloud computing, passwords that identify database users, vendor advertisements that identify subscribers, employer access to employee email, Internet Service Provider and web tracking access to online research activity, and some uses of social media. A Boston attorney with expertise in confidentiality and privacy law will outline the scope of ethical and legal requirements for attorneys and for the librarians and IT staff who support them. Participants will receive tips on how to support compliance with confidentiality requirements. A significant portion of the presentation will be devoted to audience questions in order to address specific concerns of those attending.


Organizers/Presenters

Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 304

3:45pm

PLL-SIS Program: The New "A" Team: Library and Marketing

Target Audience: Librarians who want to increase their value and visibility within their firm

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will learn tips for collaborating with the marketing department as well as the benefits it brings for both departments.
2) Participants will be able to identify best practices for streamlining and organizing workflow between these two departments.

For librarians who have seen a need for competitive intelligence (CI), or who have been charged with setting up such a program, this panel discussion will provide practical tips on how to work with not only attorneys, but also your firm’s marketing and/or business development team to make it happen. Mark Gediman saw that opportunity at Best Best & Krieger, and convinced his executive committee and CMO to work with him to develop and launch the program. Louella Randall was charged with creating a CI program at Sutherland Asbill & Brennan. After hiring John Jackson and embedding him in the business development area, Randall, Jackson, and Senior Director of Client & Practice Development Kelly Williams Rike have worked closely together to improve and streamline the research process. Hear a lively discussion that will leave you with advice and insights about the process that you can use at your own firm.


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for John L. Jackson

John L. Jackson

Business Research Librarian, Sutherland Asbill & Brennan
I moved into business research at Sutherland Asbill & Brennan in Atlanta after 14 years as a research librarian at two major daily newspapers. I am passionate about helping my firm grow by offering genuine insights into companies and industries worldwide.


Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 207

3:45pm

Diversity Symposium on Cultural Intelligence: Are You Culturally Competent? (sponsored by LexisNexis)

Target Audience: Librarians looking to increase their knowledge and understanding of cultural intelligence (CQ) and its importance in the workplace

 

Learning Outcomes: 
1) Participants will learn what cultural intelligence (CQ) is, and why it is important to know your own CQ.

2) Participants will learn how cultural intelligence is being used in the legal profession, and why it is helpful for librarians to be aware of its impact on libraries.

 

This program will discuss an overview of cross-cultural management through cultural intelligence (CQ) for developing global librarian leaders. A majority of research indicates the importance of emotional intelligence. It is only recently that cultural intelligence has surfaced as an additional characteristic of global leaders. Libraries, clients, business partners, and resources are becoming more global.  It is essential that librarians recognize the challenges of performing in an international work environment. There is a growing reliance of global resource-sharing in library services that encourages stronger global collaboration. Key questions addressed in this program include: Is cultural intelligence required for librarians to have effective cross-cultural management in a global environment? What is cultural intelligence? How does cultural intelligence impact an organization and enhance a librarian's value?  What are the challenges of performing in a global environment for librarians? A panel discussion of experts will discuss these issues and offer suggestions for success in global times.


Organizers/Presenters
MA

Michele A. Lucero

Director of Business Development & Recruiting, LAC Group


Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Sheraton-Fairfax A

5:00pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

PLL-SIS Intellectual Property Group Vendor Panel

Information providers will field questions from the moderator and audience as they discuss their products and organizational vision as it relates to IP information, research process and analysis.

 

Moderator:  Jeff Bois, Foley & Lardner

 

Panelists:  

 

Gary Cummins, FIZ on behalf of STN

Steve Kriston, Thomson Reuters

Audrey Marcus, ProQuest Dialog

Mike Hudelson, LexisNexis

Christophe Marchisio, Questel Orbit

Owen Byrd, Lex Machina


Sunday July 22, 2012 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Sheraton-Hampton AB

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:30pm

5:30pm

5:30pm

UNT/HALL/DALL/SWALL Joint Reception
THIS EVENT IS BY INVITATION ONLY
Sunday July 22, 2012 5:30pm - 7:30pm
OFFSITE-Legal Sea Foods Copley (Back Bay Room) 100 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02116

5:30pm

A Twilight Tour of Salem

The Witch Trials of the 1690's and the China Trade Era are the two major historical events that made Salem famous. You'll walk through its charming streets, with a local guide exploring the sites and stories of Salem's unusual history. Your tour will include a walk down Chestnut Street which has been called the "most distinguished street in America." It is the area where the sea captains of the China Trade Era built their beautiful federal style homes. Your visit also includes a walk by the famous House of Seven Gables and the Witch House, a war memorial and private homes that range in architecture from the late 1600's to the mid 1800's. Your guide will create a portrait and an understanding of the legacy of the witch trials, and how this chapter in Salem's history influenced the city for generations to come.

A delicious seated dinner will be served at Capt’s Waterfront Grill and Pub, overlooking the harbor after the tour’s conclusion. This is an event that cannot be replicated anywhere else but in Salem, and will be remembered as a special and unique experience!

Sunday, July 22
Approximate Timing: 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.
 
Cost: $125.00 per person, based on (25) guests - Book this tour

Included Features: Round trip transportation via Mini coach, services of a tour guide, specialized twilight tour, complete 3 course dinner with (1) glass house wine/beer, taxes and gratuity
* Menu to be determined


Sunday July 22, 2012 5:30pm - 10:30pm
Salem

5:45pm

6:00pm

6:30pm

6:30pm

7:00pm

Black Caucus Annual Scholarship Dinner
Sunday July 22, 2012 7:00pm - 9:00pm
OFFSITE-Tupelo's Restaurant 1193 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA 02139

7:30pm

8:30pm

 
Monday, July 23
 

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

Thomson Reuters Meeting with SCCLL Leaders
THIS EVENT IS BY INVITATION ONLY
Monday July 23, 2012 7:00am - 8:15am
Sheraton-Berkeley B

7:00am

ALL-SIS Directors Breakfast (directors only)

Ticketed event: $53.00; advance registration required by June 29.


Monday July 23, 2012 7:00am - 8:30am
Sheraton-Independence Ballroom West

7:00am

ALL-SIS Middle Managers Breakfast (sponsored by William S. Hein & Co., Inc.)

Ticketed event: $25.00; advance registration required by June 29.


Monday July 23, 2012 7:00am - 8:30am
Sheraton-Back Bay Ballroom A

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

PLL-Fastcase Hospitality Suite

Please come relax and network with your colleagues and enjoy a morning coffee and danish, afternoon snacks, light hors d'oeuvres or a nightcap from 7am – 11:00pm in the Fenway Suite # 2807.


Monday July 23, 2012 7:00am - 11:59pm
Sheraton-Fenway Suite (Room 2807)

7:15am

7:15am

7:30am

8:15am

AALL/ILTA Program: Partnering with IT

Target Audience: Library managers and directors; technical services librarians; research managers; library staff responsible for implementing software and/or working with vendors to implement online services

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will be able to provide IT with the information they need to facilitate a smooth implementation of a product or online service, as well as provide IT with proper requirements for any custom development work that the library needs.

2) Participants will strategically examine the skills of the library staff in order to describe them in a way that will resonate with technology executives.

Sometimes it seems as if librarians are from Venus and technologists are from Mars.  This highly interactive session will explore two aspects of partnering effectively with IT.  Learn how you can position the library to play a strategic role in firm technology initiatives and be a savvy consumer of IT services.  A CIO for a large firm will talk about how his world changed when the library was added to his areas of responsibility, what his world is like now, and what he looks for in partners on technology initiatives. A director of knowledge management and library services at a large law firm will explain how the librarian’s skill set brings value to technology projects. Learn strategies to position the library as a "go-to" resource for technology projects, such as enterprise search, intranets, precedent collections, and mobile technology.  A panel of IT professionals will candidly discuss how to get the support you need for building a custom application, integrating data from your library systems into your portal, or implementing commercial products on the firm’s network.  This is your chance to ask the questions you would love to pose to your IT colleagues. A glossary of technical terms, a checklist for implementing software, guidelines for developing a requirements document for a custom database, and other tips will be provided so that you are well prepared when asking IT for help with a project.


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Keith Schultz

Keith Schultz

Keith Schultz is the Director of Information Services at Brown Rudnick LLP [brownrudnick.com]. He oversees the firm's business systems, records management, Web site, e-Discovery & application development.


Monday July 23, 2012 8:15am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 312

8:30am

ALL-SIS Program: A Teachable Moment: The Relevance of Results Using Digests and Citators in Westlaw and Lexis

Target Audience: Teachers of legal research

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to explain the differences in the relevance of results generated in the citator and digest functions in Lexis and Westlaw.
2) Participants will be able to create classroom demonstrations and exercises that illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of intermediated searching and purely computer-generated searching.

This program will discuss empirical research into the differences in the results obtained from database searches using primarily intermediated systems (West's headnotes and key numbers) or primarily computer-generated systems (Lexis's Topics and More Like This Headnote). The program will also examine the search results from using Shepard's and Keycite, where each system utilizes a different algorithm. The visible difference in results can be used to illustrate how variable search results are in different databases. Recommended teaching methods for using this data to assist students in understanding the benefits and limitations of computer-assisted and human-assisted searches will be shared.


Organizers/Presenters

Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:00am
HCC-Room 206

8:30am

D1: The Innovative Interfaces/SkyRiver vs. OCLC Lawsuit: Who Wins? Who Loses?

Target Audience: Library managers and system librarians with responsibility for the selection and implementation of integrated library systems; librarians interested in vendor practices and the automation marketplace; librarians interested in the future of library automation

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify the major issues in the lawsuit and how it may impact the library automation marketplace.
2) Participants will be able to identify some of the major trends influencing library automation.

The SkyRiver/Innovative Interfaces lawsuit against OCLC for monopoly practices has potentially wide-ranging impact for the law library world. These two major automation players, whose business interests were formerly in separate worlds, are now in direct competition. While OCLC has long been the primary bibliographic utility for copy cataloging, SkyRiver has recently become a new vendor supplying bibliographic records to libraries. And while Innovative Interfaces has long been the provider of integrated library systems (especially for law libraries), the development of Worldcat Local and Web Management Services by OCLC makes it a significant player in this market, too. This program will present the facts surrounding this lawsuit, what it may mean for libraries, and some projections for the future of library automation.


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Marshall Breeding

Marshall Breeding

Creator & Editor, Library Technology Guides
Marshall Breeding is an independent consultant, speaker, and author. He is the creator and editor of Library Technology Guides and the libraries.org online directory of libraries on the Web. His monthly column Systems Librarian appears in Computers in Libraries; he is the Editor for Smart Libraries Newsletter published by the American Library Association, and has authored the annualLibrary Systems Report published by American Libraries since... Read More →
SM

Scott Matheson

Assoc. Librarian for Technical Services, Yale Law Library


Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 309

8:30am

D2: Linked Data, Law Libraries, and the Semantic Web

Target Audience: Law librarians interested in extending the reach of their catalogs

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will understand how linked data in our current catalog records can impact user searches.
2) Participants will understand the basic structure of Resource Description Framework (RDF).

Catalogers and systems developers might appreciate the potential of the Semantic Web, but it is difficult to see how a library’s catalog data can be linked in. Diane Hillmann, John Joergensen, and F. Tim Knight will provide an overview and live project examples of how Resource Description and Access (RDA), Search Engine Optimization (SEO), Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs), and Resource Description Framework (RDF) can push libraries’ records onto the web and extend catalog functionality.



Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 302

8:30am

D3: The Law of the Salem Witch Trials

Target Audience: Librarians and researchers interested in the historical development of law and the use of early American legal research sources, both in print and online

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to explain how 17th century Anglo-American courts reconciled supernatural beliefs and the rule of law.
2) Participants will be able to locate primary and secondary historical legal sources on early American witchcraft trials using print and electronic sources, including publicly available databases of pre-Revolutionary materials.

In 1692, 20 people from Salem Village, about 10 miles north of Boston, were killed during the infamous Salem Witch Trials. While the trials are often portrayed as arbitrary, they actually followed very strict rules that had been developed over centuries. Librarians from the Jacob Burns Law Library, which has an extensive collection of materials on witchcraft trials, will look at the substantive and procedural laws regulating witchcraft trials in the late 17th century, how they came to be, and how they were applied in the Massachusetts Colony during the Salem trials. The identification and use of primary and secondary legal history materials will be discussed, including formerly scarce materials that are now widely available electronically.



Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 306

8:30am

D4: Access to Justice Committees and the Growing Importance of Law Librarian Involvement

Target Audience: Law librarians who serve pro se litigants and need to understand the role of statewide committees that advance partnerships and strategies for enhancing access-to-justice initiatives at a policy/program level; law librarians who consider Access to Justice (A2J) committees as critical advocates for the preservation of library programs


Learning Outcomes:
1) Attendees will be able to describe the impact of A2J committees in the preservation of law library services.
2) Attendees will learn how they can connect with these committees in their respective states to expand the law librarian’s role in access-to-justice initiatives.

Engaging with key organizations can help law librarians broaden their base of support and increase their effectiveness. This program will give an overview of A2J committees around the country. Participants will learn how the committees work and about their importance for the preservation of law libraries and access to legal information.  Very few law librarians are currently members of A2J committees, but law librarians who are A2J members in Washington and Maryland will describe the ways their committee connections strengthen partnerships with courts, legal aid organizations, and bar associations. Speakers will explain how connections to A2J committees help promote law libraries and how they create mutually beneficial opportunities to expand A2J. A short question-and-answer period will invite audience participants to offer input regarding their local A2J and advocacy efforts.



Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 304

8:30am

D5: Law Library Research Assistant Programs: Two Different Models

Target Audience: Library directors in academic law libraries; public services librarians who teach or provide faculty services

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to assess the potential for expanded faculty service at their law school libraries, explain the benefits and potential drawbacks of using each of the predominant models of library research assistant (RA) programs, and identify institutional factors essential to the success of such programs.
2) Participants will learn how to design a library RA program that supports institutional objectives and fits the staffing and funding profile of their particular library.

A law library research assistant (RA) program can enhance a library’s value and market librarian skills within the institution, while expanding the teaching role of librarians. A library RA program promotes faculty recruitment and retention by providing skilled and accountable research assistants to law faculty. Two predominant models of library RA programs exist in U.S. law schools, and administrators of these programs get many inquiries from other academic librarians who are interested in starting their own programs. Law librarians representing the two models will explain the distinctions among their programs and the factors that make their models successful.



Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 210

8:30am

D6: Making Sense of Canadian Legislation

Target Audience: Librarians from any field who need to find and understand Canadian legislation

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify and explain core Canadian legislative concepts to patrons.
2) Participants will be able to identify and explain Canadian statutory citations.

Have you ever looked a Canadian statute but didn’t understand how it was amended? Has your law firm recently retained a Canadian client? Have you ever had to find a Canadian statute but were left empty-handed? Are you just plain curious as to how your neighbors to the north draft, organize, and publish their legislation? If you said “yes” to any of these questions, this program is for you! At this session, you will learn about the differences between Canadian and American legislation, how Canadian legislation becomes law, how it is organized and published, and how it is consolidated. Three experienced Canadian law librarians will provide the introductory material you need.



Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 311

8:30am

PLL-SIS Program: Technical Services by the Seat of Your Pants

Target Audience: Librarians who are handling technical services for the first time or who would like to learn more about this function of the library

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will learn what technical services work entails, and the competencies required to do it.

2) Participants will learn how seasoned technical services librarians manage these functions in a university, law firm, and government agency library, as well as how to implement efficient and successful technical services sections in their own libraries.

This program addresses the questions: What is 'technical services'? What do technical services staff do? What can I expect from them? What will my institution—university, law firm, or government agency—expect from the library's technical services department? How do I create and implement a successful technical services unit in my library when I have never done this type of work before?

A panel of experienced technical services librarians – representing a law firm library, a government agency, and a university library – will describe how they learned technical services, how they developed successful technical services workflows, and how they manage and train technical services staff. Additionally, these pros will discuss how to identify and address the critical issues of their type of institution, including budgeting, providing access to resources, and managing contractors.


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Christine Korytnyk Dulaney

Christine Korytnyk Dulaney

Pence Law Library American Unversity
Christine Dulaney is currently Associate Law Librarian for Technical and Metadata Services at the Pence Law Library of American University in Washington, DC. In both her current position as well as in her previous position as Head of Technical Services in at the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress, Christine has managed staff reorganizations as these library collections transitioned from print to online formats... Read More →


Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 207

9:00am

9:00am

Daily Paper-The Hub

The Hub, AALL’s daily conference paper, will help keep you informed during the 2012 Annual Meeting. Published for the four days of the conference (Saturday–Tuesday) in print—plus two electronic editions—it will feature articles of interest to those attending the meeting, including program and meeting announcements, articles about featured speakers, and helpful advice from selected librarians from around the country. Also featured will be information about the Boston area, including articles on historical sites, cultural events, tours, and dining.

Be sure to check our blog The Hub-Bub regularly, too, for news and updates about conference happenings in our host city.

Interested persons wishing to submit articles or other information to the Hub should send them to Joan Shear at Boston College Law Library.

• Articles for the electronic preview edition must be received by June 7.
• Articles for the first print edition must be received by July 9.
• Onsite, the deadline is 1:00 p.m. for the next day's edition.


Monday July 23, 2012 9:00am - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 209

9:00am

Placement Office

The AALL Placement Committee is proud to offer online job and candidate searching as part of the Placement Office at the AALL Annual Meeting and Conference in Boston. Posting through the AALL Career Center offers many benefits to employers and job seekers. Best of all, you don't have to be in Boston for the AALL Conference, and you don't even have to be in the Placement Office to take part in the action!

http://www.aallnet.org/conference/more/placement-services


Monday July 23, 2012 9:00am - 5:00pm
Sheraton-The Fens

9:45am

Meet the Candidates for the AALL Executive Board

Candidates for the 2012 AALL Executive Board election have been announced - "Meet the Candidates" is your chance to get close and personal with them! Come meet and mingle with the candidates for vice-president/president-elect, treasurer, and the AALL Executive Board. Take advantage of this opportunity to become better informed about the candidates before the November election. Come with your questions and find out what each candidate plans for the future of your Association.


Monday July 23, 2012 9:45am - 10:45am
HCC-Exhibit Hall-Level 2

9:45am

10:45am

CS-SIS Program: Enhancing Your Library's Web Presence with HTML5

Target Audience: Electronic services and web development librarians

Learning outcomes:
1) Participants will assess and analyze trends in web development, including usability and accessibility.
2) Participants will be able to identify aspects of their current websites that can benefit from HTML5 and implement appropriate code.

HTML has been the basis for structuring and presenting content on the web for 20 years. The current revision, HTML5, promises to dramatically increase the functionality of web documents and web applications. Even though HTML5 is not slated for recommendation until 2014, many of its features can be implemented now. These features include: semantic tag elements, easy multimedia support, interactive form inputs (that don't require JavaScript), and mobile device integration. Focusing on how implementation of HTML5 features can increase the usability and accessibility of library websites, this presentation will include a live demonstration of many HTML5 elements. Attendees will leave prepared to develop their own HTML5 content.


Organizers/Presenters

Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 207

10:45am

E1: State Advocacy Strategies: Learning to Connect, Grow, and Survive

Target Audience: Law librarians battling to safeguard public law library service against proposed state budget cuts that—should they become reality—challenge its very existence

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will identify alternative advocacy strategies devised by public law librarians (state, court, and county) aimed at preserving their operations in hard economic times.
2) Participants will be able to select, from among these alternative strategies, a blended advocacy plan—drawing elements from other states, but tailored to fit their own unique jurisdictions.

Faced with hard economic times, state governments are pinching savings from every budget line-item, often at a huge cost to public service. Protecting law libraries in such an environment requires a coordinated strategy. Unfortunately, there are 50 states, each with its own unique context. No single “master plan” fits all. Sharing experiences can, however, show what works—and what does not work—in particular circumstances. Such knowledge enables each individual to profit from the collective experience, extracting those elements that forge a productive local strategy. This program will constitute a culminating event built through speaker-structured conversation in the AALL Members Only section of AALLNET. This continuous online discussion—interactive and always current—fosters strategy-sharing in distinct, volatile environments. All speakers, networking from process inception until the Annual Conference, will draw from this raw material a strategic paradigm: a menu of alternatives that, in some combination, may prove useful anywhere. It is expected that this process, presently targeted for 2011-2012, will be ongoing. Building collective strategies never ends. It progresses from year, to year, to year.



Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 210

10:45am

E2: Engaging and Educating the Screen Addicts of 2012

Target Audience: Librarians looking for ways to enhance their digital presence among patrons, especially through the use of custom-made instructional modules and digital media

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify the latest trends involving patron learning habits, especially with regard to technology and digital media.
2) Participants will explore the process of creating library instructional guides that are tailored for today’s users, using two different methods—a purpose-built design and LibGuides; participants will understand the challenges and successes of each method.

This program will explore the depth of student engagement with digital media, specifically how to manage and deal with information-complacent patrons through new methods of engagement within instructional materials. Two librarians will share their case studies of how they incorporated digital media tools into their instructional materials in an effort to engage today’s tech-savvy patrons, and will also inspire participants to incorporate digital media into their own instructional materials and library guides by showcasing an exemplary librarian-created product, Lawbore, (http://lawbore.net/) and its sister site Learnmore (http://learnmore.lawbore.net/). The speakers will then provide participants with ideas and tips on how the average librarian with limited resources and IT knowledge can create his or her own digital media-enhanced products using tools such as LibGuides.


Organizers/Presenters
EA

Emily Allbon

City University London
Based in London, UK I'm interested in everything associated with law, learning and technology. I developed the Lawbore website back in 2003 for the law school at City University London and it's been going strong ever since! Now features include a legal skills wiki, Learnmore and Careers blog, Future Lawyer. Looking forward to speaking at AALL for the first time since 2006!


Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 302

10:45am

E3: Seminoles and Gators: Can Shared Patron-Driven Acquisitions of E-books Overcome the Rivalry?

Target Audience: Collection development librarians, acquisitions librarians, catalogers, and systems librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to negotiate a shared patron-driven e-book acquisitions plan that meets the needs of individual institutions.
2) Participants will be able to identify and evaluate opportunities for inter-institutional collaboration in e-book collection development.

This program describes the experiences of two state university law schools that joined forces to craft a shared patron-driven acquisitions program with a common vendor. Building a shared e-book collection among the state university libraries in Florida has been talked about for some time, though budget cuts and reorganization have prevented it from becoming a reality. Forced to look at creative ways to maximize acquisitions budgets, the law libraries at Florida State University and University of Florida worked with Ingram Coutts to adopt a shared PDA plan for legal monographs. By combining resources, the libraries were able to provide their users access to far more titles than would have been possible with individual plans. In this presentation, each school will discuss working together and with the vendor to create a shared profile, how they were able to exclude titles already owned or preferred in print, and how the PDA dovetails with each school’s collection development goals. They will also share how the plan impacted their individual budgets, workflows, and library management systems, as well as how it was received by users. A representative from Ingram Coutts will discuss the challenges and benefits of developing a single PDA plan that would meet the individual needs of two separate law schools. How these rival schools came together and whether they are still partners in this effort will be presented by three players on this unlikely team.


Organizers/Presenters
EG

Erin Gallagher

Collections Consultant, Ingram Coutts
Erin Gallagher is a Collections Consultant for Ingram Library Services, a leader in distribution, print-on-demand, and academic library services.  Erin's coverage area includes the Southeastern US and Atlantic Canada, where she partners with academic libraries to build and maintain Approval, Slip, and Patron-driven profiles.  She joined Ingram in 2010 after completing her M.L.I.S. from Florida State University.  While at FSU... Read More →


Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 304

10:45am

E4: Digitizing Legal History

Target Audience: Librarians interested in digital libraries and digitizing government documents

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify the steps involved in building a subject-based digital library.
2) Participants will be able to describe how to curate a digital collection of historic legal documents.

This program identifies the steps involved in building a digital archive of litigation documents related to the Mt. Laurel cases, a series of groundbreaking cases on affordable housing in New Jersey regarded as the state law equivalent of Brown v. Board of Education. Just as Brown forced the “American dilemma” of race onto the national political agenda, the New Jersey Supreme Court used judicial power to put the “political third rail” of suburban housing equity and affordability before legislators and governors who would have preferred to ignore the problem. Speakers will explain the basics involved in a successful digitization project, including selection, funding, digitizing documents, cost management, metadata, workflow, quality control, website design, the use of open source software, digital preservation, and publicity.


Organizers/Presenters
WF

Wei Fang

Assistant Dean for Information Technology, Rutgers Law School
Digital libraries, UI design, Web interactions, information retrieval, distance learning, video


Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 306

10:45am

E5: Scanning the Future: QR Codes in Law Libraries

Target Audience: Individuals responsible for teaching, outreach, and marketing at their libraries; individuals interested in incorporating Quick Response (QR) codes into their workflow

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will assess the usefulness of QR codes for their libraries.
2) Participants will be able to create QR codes and incorporate them into instructional and marketing materials.

QR codes have been rapidly increasing in popularity. Companies and libraries alike use them to connect people with online information when and where they need it. They can be used to link physical and electronic resources and to direct patrons to up-to-the-minute information about library services. The presenters will discuss why their libraries chose QR codes over competing formats, how they have made use of these codes, and pitfalls to avoid when implementing QR code programs. They will also teach participants how to create QR codes and integrate them seamlessly into instructional and marketing materials. Participants will have the tools necessary to evaluate whether QR codes are right for their libraries and to develop innovative uses that meet their patrons’ needs.


Organizers/Presenters
AR

Anna Russell

Anna is a Reference and Electronic Resources librarian at the University of San Diego Law School since 2011. Her particular interest is in electronic legal resource authentication, preservation, and sharing. She enjoys working with patrons to seek out legal data from the online environment. In the rapidly changing age of digital information, Anna seeks to provide patrons with the most efficient tips and fun tools for online legal research.


Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 311

10:45am

E6: Growing Beyond the Four Walls of Your Library into Strategic Knowledge Management

Target Audience: Law library directors, managers, and supervisors looking to extend the scope of responsibilities to enterprise knowledge management

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will understand what “knowledge management” (KM) is and grasp the benefits and challenges of adopting KM strategy.
2) Participants will understand the roles law librarians can play in portal deployment at law firms and examine case studies of KM projects lead by law librarians.

The program will cover what “knowledge management” is and the types of knowledge in law firms that require KM strategies and solutions. A demonstration of several KM projects will show the role law librarians play in leading KM initiatives. Librarians will understand how to go back to their firms to propose KM projects. The session will conclude with a discussion of the benefits/ROI and challenges involved in developing a KM enterprise strategy so that law librarians can develop a business case to get their KM initiative approved.



Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 309

10:45am

FCIL-SIS Program: Roman Law Interest Group Presents, "Connecting Roman Law Books: Commentaries, Marginalia, Bookplates, and More"

Target Audience: Anyone interested in early legal and publishing history or a serendipitous intellectual interlude

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will learn about the role that printers played in developing law.
2) Participants will learn how authors, teachers, and collectors used books to learn, connect, and grow the law.

How do books learn, connect and grow? Marginalia, bookplates, page layout, and publishing history give clues to what authors, teachers, publishers, printers, readers, and collectors did to develop the field of law from ancient times to modern. Join our discussion with your favorite book connection.


Organizers/Presenters

Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 205

10:45am

OBS-SIS Program: Hot Topic – Are E-books the Future?

Target Audience: Anyone interested in future information technology trends in libraries

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify current information technology issues in libraries.
2) Participants will be able to identify at least one future trend in information technology in libraries.

Join this discussion about the impact of e-books in libraries. How will this trend affect collection development, budgets, and staffing? Will the introduction and use of e-books lead to greater patron satisfaction? What will libraries need to do to prepare for this new format?


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Marshall Breeding

Marshall Breeding

Creator & Editor, Library Technology Guides
Marshall Breeding is an independent consultant, speaker, and author. He is the creator and editor of Library Technology Guides and the libraries.org online directory of libraries on the Web. His monthly column Systems Librarian appears in Computers in Libraries; he is the Editor for Smart Libraries Newsletter published by the American Library Association, and has authored the annualLibrary Systems Report published by American Libraries since... Read More →


Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 206

10:45am

RIPS-SIS Program: Connect with Patrons by Creating Strong Research Guides

Target Audience: Librarians who create or update research guides


Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will be able to identify best practices for managing and creating research guides.
2) Participants will be able to select the appropriate type of research guide for their patrons' needs.

The advent of online technologies has led to an explosion of available research resources, making the efforts of librarians to direct users to the best sources more critical than ever. One of the ways libraries can meet this need is by creating and updating online research guides for its users. This session will cover best practices for preparing these guides--including the initial decision to develop a guide in a particular area or of a particular type--the steps taken to create it, and how to markets a guide’s use once completed.



Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 202

10:45am

AALL/ILTA Program: iCan! Empowering Librarians with iPads and Other Mobile Devices

Target Audience: All librarians who are interested in technology leadership

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will be able to identify new opportunities and roles for law librarians as the use of mobile devices and iPads continues to grow in the legal workplace. 

2) Participants will learn about features and apps for iPads and other mobile devices that are useful for lawyers and law librarians.

Lawyers expect their mobile devices to connect at their workplace, and many now have iPads for personal use.  Law students use smartphones to access resources and expect to use iPads in the classroom. Some law firms and courts have embraced the iPad as their mobile tool of choice.  How does the law librarian fit into this picture?  Hear from a law firm director of library and research services who stepped up to answer the question many attorneys ask upon receiving an iPad:  What am I supposed to do with this?  Discover a variety of lawyer- and law student-friendly apps for accessing firm and law school library resources, performing online research, and increasing productivity of iPads and various other mobile devices.  An academic law library administrator will also describe the role his library staff played in developing and publicizing to the law school community a multi-platform smartphone app for accessing key library services. Attendees will gain a better understanding of the mobile device world and be better able to engage in conversations about the iPad’s place in legal settings. The session concludes with audience questions.



Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 12:00pm
HCC-Room 312

11:00am

Social Law Library - John Adams Courthouse

***This tour has reached capacity.***

Transportation: Attendees should arrange their own transportation; conference volunteers will be available to guide the group using public transportation.

Established in 1804, Social Law Library is one of the oldest law libraries in the United States and one of the oldest civic and cultural organizations in Boston. Social Law Library is located in the beautifully renovated John Adams Courthouse, the seat of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court and the Massachusetts Appeals Court. This tour will detail the collection strengths and services of the Social Law Library.

There is no charge for this tour, but advance registration is required.


Monday July 23, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm
Social Law Library - John Adams Courthouse

12:00pm

Past President's Luncheon
Monday July 23, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Sheraton-Gardner A

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

Annual Meeting Program Committee 2013 Open Forum

The 2013 Annual Meeting Program Committee invites you to the AMPC Open Forum to learn about the program proposal and selection processes. 

 

Be sure to take a moment to complete a brief survey to let the AMPC know what kind of programming you'd like to see in Seattle next year: http://www.cvent.com/d/5cq1kd.


Monday July 23, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Sheraton-Gardner B

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

Thomson Reuters Luncheon for Government and Academic Librarians
THIS EVENT IS BY INVITATION ONLY
Monday July 23, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
HCC-Room 300

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

FCIL-SIS Program: The Executive Committee Presents, "The Recipient of the FCIL Schaffer Grant for Foreign Law Librarians"

Target Audience: All AALL members

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to explain the legal culture and legal information environment of a foreign country.
2) Participants will be able to identify key resources for legal research in a foreign legal jurisdiction.

The recipient of the 2012 FCIL Schaffer Grant for Foreign Law Librarians will discuss how to best understand and examine the legal system, legal information environment, and law libraries of another country.


Organizers/Presenters

Monday July 23, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
HCC-Room 205

12:00pm

LHRB-SIS Program: "Digging" Legal History in Boston: The Case of the Boston Strangler

Target Audience: Librarians and researchers interested in learning the uses of modern forensic science techniques and exhumation to prove legal historical facts; librarians and researchers who wish to learn about the forensic developments in the Boston Strangler case that changed the face of this crime

Learning outcomes:

1) Participants will be able to assess the role of modern forensic science techniques and exhumation in re-examinations of historical legal events.

2) Participants will be able to explain how forensic techniques unavailable during the 1960s produced evidence 36 years later indicating that the publicly accepted identity of the Boston Strangler may be a mistake.

The person lodged in the public consciousness as the Boston Strangler never stood trial for the murders of 11 women in the Boston area from 1962 to 1964. Although defense attorney F. Lee Bailey obtained the confession of Albert DeSalvo, no physical evidence linked DeSalvo to the killings, and his versions of the killings did not harmonize fully with the facts. James E. Starrs, Professor Emeritus of Law and Forensic Sciences at George Washington University Law School, led the team that performed the exhumation and re-autopsy of Mary Sullivan, the Strangler's purported last victim, and DeSalvo, both at the request of the families. Starrs returns to AALL to discuss the forensic evidence obtained during re-examination, and how this evidence destroyed the credibility of DeSalvo's claim to be the Boston Strangler.


Organizers/Presenters

Monday July 23, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
HCC-Room 206

12:00pm

12:30pm

1:00pm

Harvard Law School Library (1:00 p.m. bus tour)

***This tour has reached capacity.***

Transportation:The 1:00 p.m. tour will include motor coach transportation (transportation fee applies).

The Harvard Law School Library is the largest academic law library in the United States. Established in 1817, the library has continued to reinvent itself. Come take a walking tour of the library to learn about the library’s most recent changes – as they relate to collections, use of space, and innovations in service.

$10.00; advance registration by June 29 is required.


Monday July 23, 2012 1:00pm - 1:45pm
Harvard Law School Library

1:15pm

AALL/ILTA Program: Current Awareness – Delivering the Right News at the Right Time

Target Audience: Law firm librarians who are responsible for distributing information throughout their law firms

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will be able to evaluate the current awareness needs of their firm.

2) Participants will be able to identify solutions for organizing and delivering information in their firm.

"Infobesity" doesn't begin to define the current awareness problems facing legal professionals today, but there are new and evolving ways to meet the challenge of getting the right news to people in a less disruptive manner.  Librarians and technologists can team up to find creative and effective ways to locate a good source, sift through it for relevant content, curate it, consolidate it with other sources, organize it, and deliver it in a variety of ways to reduce the interruptions and distractions caused by too-frequent emails and alerts. This program will help librarians evaluate the available tools to make informed decisions.  Case studies will illustrate solutions in action, including ways to include internal content, and what mobile options can and cannot do.


Organizers/Presenters

Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 312

1:15pm

CS-SIS Program: Hot Topic: E-books

Target Audience: Librarians who want a deeper understanding of e-book technology

 

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will identify the software tools required to convert content into e-books.

2) Participants will compare various publishing options for distributing e-books.

 

Tom Boone, Reference Librarian at Loyola Law School Los Angeles, and Jason Eiseman, Head of Technology Services at Yale Law Library, will discuss emerging trends in e-books. This session will include an in-depth look at the technology, tools, and techniques for creating, editing, and publishing e-books in various formats for various platforms. See real-life examples of e-book creation and publishing by law libraries.


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Cindy Bassett

Cindy Bassett

Electronic Services Librarian, University of Missouri Law School Library
Cindy Bassett is the Electronic Services Librarian at the University of Missouri Law School Library where she manages access to databases, teaches first-year law students how to do legal research, and manages the Law Schools institutional repository. Cindy also has an interest in library marketing and spearheads many of the library’s marketing campaigns, including the use of Twitter and Facebook to connect with students and alumni.
avatar for Jason Eiseman

Jason Eiseman

Head of Technology Services, Yale Law Library


Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 202

1:15pm

F1: Lost in Translation: Immigration Detention and Access to Legal Materials

Target Audience: All librarians interested in greater access to legal materials

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to connect with nonprofit organizations working to improve access to legal materials for immigration detainees.
2) Participants will be able to identify the obstacles to library access for immigration detainees.

In 2010, approximately 363,000 foreign nationals were held in civil detention in the United States. About half of the detainees were held in privately run prisons. Unlike those who have been charged with a crime, they have no right to free legal counsel and do not have the same access to legal materials that are enjoyed by those who are charged with or have been convicted of crimes. The speakers will describe the current state of access to legal materials for immigration detainees, identify the ABA nonbinding standards for access to legal materials, and inform participants of efforts in the library and legal communities to improve access to legal information for persons in immigration detention.


Organizers/Presenters

Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 210

1:15pm

F2: Law Firm Libraries: Your E-book Future Has Arrived

This session will be webcast from Boston on AALL2go (member login required).


Target Audience: Law firm librarians who are directors or managers; technical services, electronic services, and reference librarians; academic librarians interested in knowing what law firms are doing with regard to e-books

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to analyze and utilize the information provided to evaluate e-book formats for use in their organizations.
2) Participants will be able to analyze and utilize the information provided to assist them in creating e-book policies for their organizations.

With little fanfare, LexisNexis has begun offering some content in e-book format (e.g., the color books such as the Redbook New York Civil Practice Law and Rules). Thomson Reuters has indicated court rules for New York and others will be in e-book format in the fourth quarter of 2011. The ABA and Apple have entered into a partnership to publish legal e-books for sale in the Apple bookstore. Visions of attorneys waving their Kindles and iPads in front of our faces demanding e-books have begun to haunt our dreams. So many questions come to mind: What will the functionality be like? How will updates work? Will attorneys want both print and e-book formats, and what will that do to our budgets? What happens when an attorney leaves, along with e-book content paid for by the firm? A panel of two firm librarians who have conducted e-book trials, and two vendors will talk about this experience, as well as what vendors are doing with regard to functionality, pricing, and administration.

 

Law firm librarians are encouraged to complete this survey in advance of the program.



Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 306

1:15pm

F3: Boston Best Friends Forever: A Collaboration Story

Target Audience: Academic librarians, library directors, collection development librarians, acquisitions librarians, etc.

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will learn how to develop successful collaborative efforts with libraries in their local area.
2) Participants will learn how to partner with other libraries to maximize access to resources and realize efficiencies.

The Boston Academic Law Library Consortium (BALLCO) is a joint undertaking to coordinate access, maintenance, and housing of law-related titles among the members of the group and to provide for expedited access to those sources as requested by the other members in this local geographic area. A panel from the six participating Boston-area academic law libraries will share their collaborative efforts to optimize their respective resources and to provide their users timely access to a wide range of legal materials. The panel will discuss the group’s efforts from inception through planning and implementation.



Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 309

1:15pm

F4: Helping Others Learn, Connect, and Grow Through Times of Stress

Target Audience: Librarians, library managers, library administrators, department heads

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will discover ways to balance personal issues with professional communication when dealing with other employees.
2) Participants will explore techniques that are utilized by a professional social worker, for dealing with sensitive staff issues.

Over the past few years, personal staff problems seem to be on the rise. Library employees are dealing with anxiety, depression, divorce, financial difficulties, and other issues which affect their productivity and ability to concentrate. Managers may find themselves spending extensive amounts of time coaching employees with personal problems at the expense of working through specific job duties. Good managers, like good counselors, understand the issues and needs, both professional and personal, of their staff. They also know how to help and motivate staff through difficult periods. Participants in this program will explore effective techniques, utilized by social workers, for counseling others who are going through difficult personal issues. Join us in a lively discussion with a librarian and social worker as we discuss, and role play real staff issues and explore effective techniques for resolving them.


Organizers/Presenters

Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 304

1:15pm

F5: The Diplomat Librarian: Working with LLMs, International Scholars, Students, and Faculty

Target Audience: Academic law librarians working in schools that have LLM students and international visiting scholars; firm librarians who support overseas offices

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify the pedagogical and research needs of international students and faculty, and explain how they differ from those of traditional JD students.
2) Participants will be able to apply techniques that address the differences, challenges, and synergies of working with an international patron base.

This program will address common questions and concerns that law librarians have when dealing with international members of the law school community in the library, the classroom, and the academy. Speakers will discuss their own experiences working with these populations and will offer best practices for dealing with language issues, different legal education cultures and perceptions of librarians and libraries, and issues arising from having patrons trained in a different type of legal system. Participants will develop an increased understanding of common issues that these unique populations present and will also receive ideas on how they can better engage this patron group in the library’s activities.



Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 302

1:15pm

F6: Lessons from the Snail Darter: The Relationship Between Wildlife Law and Economic Development

Target Audience: Academic law librarians; law librarians in firms that specialize in environmental, international, and/or land use planning law

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will examine the U.S. and international body of law affecting economic development projects where wildlife may be endangered.
2) Participants will consider the legal context in which conflicts arise between protection of wildlife and economic development projects.

The inevitable conflicts between economic development and wildlife protection are complicated and emotional. The social impacts of cases like the “snail darter case” and events like the Deepwater Horizon oil spill highlight the controversy that often surrounds crucial economic development and equally important wildlife protection. In the 30 years since TVA v. Hill, these clashes have continued both at home and abroad. Professor Zygmunt Plater, who litigated the “snail darter case” and has written and spoken extensively on the case in the past three decades, will present and analyze the body of law and ramifications that grew from that case.


Organizers/Presenters
ZJ

Zygmunt J. B. Plater

Land. Air. Water. Wildlife. And trying to sustain Humanity in all its richness on the planet it threatens.


Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 311

1:15pm

OBS-SIS Program: Local Systems Roundtable – What Does the Next Generation System Look Like?

Target Audience: OBS/TS-SIS members, other interested law librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to describe problems and solutions addressed by their colleagues.
2) Participants will be able to identify how peers with limited budgets creatively leveraged these resources and improved their systems. 

Join in a discussion about the development of the next generation library systems. What are the trends of the new library systems being developed by Ex Libris, III, Serials Solutions, and others? What is the current stage of development? When will these systems be deployed? What is the impact of these systems living in the cloud? How will the new systems change library staff workflows? Is open-source another option to be considered?


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Marshall Breeding

Marshall Breeding

Creator & Editor, Library Technology Guides
Marshall Breeding is an independent consultant, speaker, and author. He is the creator and editor of Library Technology Guides and the libraries.org online directory of libraries on the Web. His monthly column Systems Librarian appears in Computers in Libraries; he is the Editor for Smart Libraries Newsletter published by the American Library Association, and has authored the annualLibrary Systems Report published by American Libraries since... Read More →


Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 208

1:15pm

RIPS-SIS Program: Diversify Your Teaching Portfolio with Tutorials!

Target Audience: Librarians charged with developing and teaching legal information literacy to users: students, attorneys, and public patrons

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify and compare free and proprietary software options, and utilize practical tips, templates, and samples for creating tutorials.
2) Participants will be able to select the best type of tutorial for their organization and targeted audiences, and subsequently execute the steps in the tutorial production process.

Today’s challenges of teaching legal information literacy include limited face time with users, demanding millennials who want more than lectures, and the introduction of new and changing research interfaces. Creating web-based tutorials is one way to address these challenges while, simultaneously diversifying your teaching portfolio. Tutorials can be instructional, reinforcing, and/or assessment-focused. Discover the components of three types of tutorials and the best practices for ensuring your tutorials are tailored to the learning needs of your particular audience. Also learn about the various free and proprietary software options for creating tutorials. To assist in the tutorial production process, participants will be provided with tips and cautions, templates and samples, sources for multimedia content, and a selected bibliography of sources about creating and utilizing tutorials.


Organizers/Presenters

Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 207

1:15pm

TS-SIS Program: The Accidental Archivists: Lessons Learned from a Digital Archive Project

Target Audience: Library managers; technical services librarians; any librarians who are interested in digital archive projects

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify and discuss the major issues involved with creating a digital archive.
2) Participants will be able to develop an action plan for creating a digital archive in their own institutions.

In July 2011, the University of Colorado’s William A. Wise Law Library received a large and unexpected donation of print materials when former dean and prolific scholar David Getches passed away. The library’s small staff, which had limited experience with archives or digitization, suddenly became “accidental archivists,” with a mandated goal to create a digital archive of selected materials from the donation by April 2012. This program traces the development of the project from initiation to completion, and provides a practical case study of what to expect when a library undertakes a digitization project for the first time. The presentation will focus on several key issues: establishing digitization processes and obtaining equipment; funding; gathering permissions; planning; staffing; and using outside sources of assistance.



Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 206

2:00pm

Harvard Law School Library (2:00 p.m. bus tour)

***This tour has reached capacity.***

Transportation:The 2:00 p.m. tour will include motor coach transportation (transportation fee applies).

The Harvard Law School Library is the largest academic law library in the United States. Established in 1817, the library has continued to reinvent itself. Come take a walking tour of the library to learn about the library’s most recent changes – as they relate to collections, use of space, and innovations in service.

$10.00; advance registration by June 29 is required


Monday July 23, 2012 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Harvard Law School Library

2:45pm

AALL/ILTA Program: SharePoint as a Showcase for Library Resources and Knowledge Repositories

Target Audience: Law firm librarians who are responsible for building awareness of resources and services; librarians who have an interest in building upon existing technical skills to create collaborative solutions

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will gain perspective on basic features of SharePoint, such as no-code development and taxonomy/metadata management.

2) Participants will examine case studies,which include solutions that librarians have developed to meet the business needs of their organizations, and gain ideas for how they can do the same.

Join library and knowledge management (KM) professionals who are responsible for architecting solutions in SharePoint to explore a variety of ways to bring value to your firm/organization.  Find out why SharePoint is so powerful and easy to learn and use for creating custom pages without coding experience.  Panelists will explain how SharePoint 2010 "thinks like a librarian" in utilizing features such as taxonomy/metadata management services.  They will also provide examples of how librarians are directly involved with intranet development, not only in creating research pages, but also in creating team sites to increase efficiency for collection envelopment, lateral onboarding/orientation, and general project/task management.  Additionally, client extranets and the value librarians can bring to these projects will be discussed.



Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 312

2:45pm

CS-SIS Program (roundtable): "What's it All About, Techie?" Does Educational Technology Help Law Students Learn the Law?

Target Audience: IT/educational technology librarians, law firm librarians, and other librarians who are interested in the effectiveness of technology in law classes

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will discuss whether educational technology improves law students’ comprehension of legal subjects and helps prepare them for the modern practice of law.
2) Participants will discuss appropriate implementations of effective technologies in teaching legal concepts.

Technology has been an important part of legal education for many years now, but does technology ultimately help students to “learn the law”? In this roundtable, participants will discuss whether technology improves students’ comprehension of legal subjects and helps to prepare them for practice. The participants will also share their own experiences and discuss best practices.


Organizers/Presenters

Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 300

2:45pm

Distinguished Lectureship Address by Award Winner Anne Klinefelter: Should Librarians Retire the Privacy Ethic?

AALL's Ethical Principles include a duty to respect confidentiality and privacy.  AALL's Government Relations Committee promotes USA PATRIOT Act amendments to strengthen library users' privacy.  And AALL's Principles for Licensing include requirements that database vendors protect privacy.  Librarians in general are widely known as leaders in privacy advocacy. 

 

But can we really protect library users from being tracked individually by database producers, search engines, websites, and mobile reader devices?   And does government access to this collected data undermine our PATRIOT Act advocacy?  Should librarians retire the privacy ethic and instead embrace the content, customization, remote access, cloud efficiencies, collection control, and safety benefits we can now purchase with privacy? 

 

Do you think librarians should protect the confidentiality of library use?  AALL members are encouraged to vote (Yes/No/Not Sure) before the Annual Meeting in anticipation of Professor Klinefelter's address.  Comments are optional, and you can vote anonymously or not.


Organizers/Presenters

Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 208

2:45pm

G1: Chinese Law – Real Time!

Target Audience: Law librarians who have Chinese law research demands

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify major government organs in China, the different types of documents produced by those organs, and the legal relationship between those documents.
2) Participants will be able to explain how to locate Chinese legal documents as soon as they are promulgated, and will compare the respective timeliness of Westlaw China, Lawinfochina, Isinolaw, and other commercial and government databases.

This program will identify major government organs in the People’s Republic of China that promulgate laws and regulations, the different types of documents produced, and the legal relationship between those documents. Participants will focus on learning how to locate these documents as fast as they are enacted. Participants will also identify leading Chinese secondary sources in cutting-edge areas. Additionally, the session will compare the timeliness of different databases, including Lawinfochina, Westlaw China, Isinolaw, and official Chinese government websites.


Organizers/Presenters

Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 210

2:45pm

G2: Turner v. Rogers, Due Process, and the Pursuit of Court Access: Trumpeting the Law Library Connection

Target Audience: Librarians interested in interpretation of this historic U.S. Supreme Court decision and the law librarian’s role in access to justice; librarians who serve self-represented litigants, especially those with civil matters

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to explain the impact Turner v. Rogers has on due process requirements for the unrepresented.
2) Participants will be able to identify new ways that law library services contribute to meeting the courts’ access standards.

Turner v. Rogers (131 S.Ct. 2507) is a 2011 decision that calls for fundamental fairness and access to the courts in civil cases. “Civil Gideon” champions the right to counsel in civil cases. Law librarians can unite with Turner as a landmark case in the delivery of legal services to the unrepresented. The Turner case offers a new perspective for advocating the library’s role in access to justice services. The program will conclude with a dialog on how law librarians might implement the Turner principles.



Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 302

2:45pm

G3: The Best of Both Worlds: Blending Online and Face-to-Face Learning in Teaching Legal Research

Target Audience: Academic librarians who teach legal research

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to design a basic blended learning course utilizing in-person class sessions, webinars, and online course management software.
2) Participants will be prepared to identify and assess at least five different integrated learning techniques to actively involve students in learning legal research.

ABA Rule 306 has permitted law schools to offer distance education classes for some time, and students increasingly enjoy the greater convenience of online courses. Legal research classes are emerging as key areas of potential innovation for law schools testing out online and blended courses. Librarians have a unique opportunity to take the lead in pioneering new ways of teaching in this new learning environment. Panelists will draw on their own experience of creating and teaching conventional, online, and blended legal research classes to review what has worked and what hasn’t. This session will include discussion of webinars, online course management systems, in-person sessions, and integrated learning techniques that actively involve students in mastering the concepts of legal research.



Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 304

2:45pm

G4: Antitrust Considerations and the Association

Target Audience: Librarians with responsibility for library administration and/or legal information purchasing decisions

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will understand the history of the Federal Trade Commission guidelines related to legal information resources and of the antitrust discussion within AALL.
2) Participants will be able to identify the challenges posed by current antitrust law on association activity, while also identifying strategies for effective collective responses to unfair licensing and publishing practices.

Join in this practical exploration of how antitrust issues relate to associations, led by Shaun Esposito, CRIV Chair 2011-2012.  Stephen W. Armstrong, Senior Counsel and chair of the Antitrust Practice Group at Montgomery, McCracken, Walker & Rhoads, LLP, will provide a brief overview of antitrust concerns relevant to professional organizations.  AALL Vendor Liaison Margaret Maes will briefly summarize the “AALL and Antitrust FAQs” recently published on AALLNET, with Armstrong providing commentary and analysis of the FAQs.  Esposito and Maes will then take turns presenting fact scenarios to Armstrong based upon activities that AALL members and leadership have identified as key challenges facing associations when considering action at the organizational level.  Audience members will then be invited to ask questions or present fact scenarios of their own for consideration.



Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 306

2:45pm

G5: Preserving Our Digital Heritage: A Conversation with Jason Scott

Target Audience: Librarians interested in computer history or who would like to learn digital preservation techniques

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to list several hurdles to preserving digital objects.
2) Participants will be able to identify steps they can take personally and professionally as librarians to help preserve digital objects.

Jason Scott has been an “armchair archivist” since 1998 with the Archive Team and Textfiles.com. He has recently become a professional archivist and works with the Internet Archive to preserve pieces of our digital heritage (e.g., discontinued social networking sites). In this free-form lecture and interview, Scott will discuss his trials and tribulations in this quest for preservation, as well as offer suggestions for steps that information professionals can take to preserve their own data and that of others. Connections will also be made between preserving “general” data and the problems with preserving law and other materials published on the Internet.


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Sarah Glassmeyer

Sarah Glassmeyer

Director of Community Development, CALI
Open Source, FOSS, Open Access, Scholarly Communication, Data, Being Awesome, Cats, eBooks, Open Law, Free Law, Libraries, Library, Information Literacy, Twitter, Blogs, Blogging, Cupcakes, Rabble Rousing, Coffee, Educational Technology, EdTech, Making lists of my interests, Legal Research, LRW, Open Education, OER, OPEN EVERYTHING, access to justice, long walks on the beach, pina coladas, getting caught in the rain., DISLIKES: The Man
JS

Jason Scott Sadofsky

I am a digital historian. I speak at cons, make documentaries, run a few websites, and bring a little tear to your eye of years gone past.


Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 309

2:45pm

G6: PIPEs, Bear Hugs, and Big Boy Letters: Revealing Corporate and Securities Terms of Art with an In-Depth Look at PIPEs

Target Audience: Librarians who want to know more about securities terms; librarians who do financial research and need to know about Private Investment in Public Equity (PIPE) transactions


Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to recognize and understand new securities terms and how they were developed.
2) Participants will be able to understand how and why PIPE transactions are used as a financing vehicle, and how to identify resources and methods for researching PIPEs.

Corporate and securities terms of art evolve as labels to identify complex mechanisms, which can be difficult to understand without knowing how the terms evolved and are used by securities and corporate attorneys. The first part of the program will cover the meaning behind some of these terms of art. The speakers will present and explain Big Boy Letters, Bear Hug Letters, a Greenshoe, a Wells Notice, and additional terms.

The second part of the program will focus on PIPEs: how they are used by companies as a financing device and how librarians can find information about them. PIPE transactions have become an increasingly important financing vehicle for many public companies, and in 2011, PIPE deals raised more than $27 billion in financings. As a consequence, librarians who work for law firms with private equity clients are being asked to research PIPE deals. This part of the program will describe for participants the PIPE market and why PIPE financings are used. Participants will also learn about online tools that librarians can use in researching PIPE transactions. The program will conclude with a discussion of search strategies for using these resources.


Organizers/Presenters
DF

Daniel F. McLaughlin

Senior Research Librarian, Weil Gotshal & Manges


Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 311

2:45pm

OBS-SIS Program: OCLC Users Roundtable

Target Audience: Anyone who uses OCLC services

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify at least one new or enhanced OCLC product or service, and assess if that product or service could be used within their library setting.
2) Participants will be able to identify at least one future development in OCLC products and services, and assess if that product or service could be used within their library setting.

OCLC provides a diverse and ever expanding and developing range of products and services (cataloging, ILL, discovery platform, library management services, etc.) to the library community. Learn about OCLC’s new and enhanced services, as well as planned future developments, directly from an OCLC representative. Following this overview, the bulk of the program time will be allotted to audience member questions and a chance to share comments, ideas, and concerns about OCLC products, RDA records, services, and best practices with the speaker and other OCLC users in the audience.


Organizers/Presenters

Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 205

3:00pm

Harvard Law School Library (3:00 p.m. tour)

***This tour has reached capacity.***

Transportation:The 3:00 p.m. tour does not include transportation. Participants should arrange their own transportation; conference volunteers will be available to guide the groups using public transportation.

The Harvard Law School Library is the largest academic law library in the United States. Established in 1817, the library has continued to reinvent itself. Come take a walking tour of the library to learn about the library’s most recent changes – as they relate to collections, use of space, and innovations in service.

 

There is no charge for this tour, but advance registration is required.


Monday July 23, 2012 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Harvard Law School Library

4:00pm

Harvard Law School Library (4:00 p.m. tour)

***This tour has reached capacity.***

Transportation:The 4:00 p.m. tour does not include transportation. Participants should arrange their own transportation; conference volunteers will be available to guide the groups using public transportation.

The Harvard Law School Library is the largest academic law library in the United States. Established in 1817, the library has continued to reinvent itself. Come take a walking tour of the library to learn about the library’s most recent changes – as they relate to collections, use of space, and innovations in service.

 

There is no charge for this tour, but advance registration is required.


Monday July 23, 2012 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Harvard Law School Library

4:15pm

AALL General Business Meeting and Members Open Forum

Resolutions submitted by AALL members prior to July 2 may be considered by the membership at the Business Meeting. During this year’s Members’ Open Forum, which immediately follows the Annual Business Meeting, the AALL president and other officers will be available to respond to member questions regarding AALL and its programs and activities. In addition to accepting questions from the floor, members can also submit questions in advance of the meeting.

 

To submit a question in advance for this year’s Open Forum, email: ambusmtg@aall.org.

 

The Hall of Fame Awards and Presidential Certificates will be presented at the Business Meeting.


Monday July 23, 2012 4:15pm - 5:30pm
HCC-Ballroom B

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SCCLL-SIS Reception (sponsored by Wolters Kluwer Law & Business)
Monday July 23, 2012 6:00pm - 8:00pm
OFFSITE-Social Law Library 1 Pemberton Sq # 4100 Boston, MA 02108

6:00pm

Beacon Hill and Public Garden Evening Tour

From the golden dome of the State House to the elegant homes of Louisburg Square, this Beacon Hill tour moves along picturesque streets highlighting examples of the architect Charles Bulfinch and his followers. Learn the story of Beacon Hill, from its rural beginnings to the visions of the Mount Vernon Proprietors while walking among this historic collection of Federal and Greek Revival row houses. A walk through the shaded streets of Beacon Hill offers a pleasant repose from a hot summer’s day. Follow your guide through the Boston Public Garden to visit all the major sculptures and monuments in the area. The Public Garden, established in 1837, is the first public botanical garden in the United States. Today, with its plant material chosen for ornamental excellence as well as its botanical diversity, it forms a green and flowering oasis in the heart of a great metropolis. No visit to Boston would be complete without a stroll in the Garden which is maintained by the Boston Parks and Recreation Department in cooperation with the Friends of the Public Garden.

Monday, July 23
Approximate Timing: 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
 
Cost: $45.00 per person, based on (25) guests - Book this tour
 
Included Features: Round trip transportation via mini coach, services of a tour guide, all taxes and gratuity
 
Please Note:
This tour includes a good deal of walking on cobblestone streets. Please wear comfortable walking shoes.


Monday July 23, 2012 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Beacon Hill

6:00pm

LHRB-SIS Reception
Monday July 23, 2012 6:00pm - 8:30pm
OFFSITE-Harvard Law School Library, Caspersen Room 1563 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA

6:30pm

6:30pm

6:30pm

6:45pm

6:45pm

 
Tuesday, July 24
 

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

PLL-Fastcase Hospitality Suite

Please come relax and network with your colleagues and enjoy a morning coffee and danish, afternoon snacks, light hors d'oeuvres or a nightcap from 7am – 11:00pm in the Fenway Suite # 2807.


Tuesday July 24, 2012 7:00am - 5:00pm
Sheraton-Fenway Suite (Room 2807)

7:15am

7:15am

7:15am

7:15am

7:30am

Coffee Talks

To keep the conversation flowing in Boston, informal “Coffee Talk” discussions will be held on Tuesday morning. Attendees can brainstorm, sound off, and share their challenges, experiences, and ideas—and strengthen ties to their professional community. The following table topics will be hosted by AALL members:

The Library Without Walls – Raising the Profile of Your Library
Martin Tomlinson, Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt

Keeping Connections Strong When You’re Part of a Virtual Team
Phyllis Thornton, McCarthy Tetrault LLP

Sharing State Advocacy Strategies to Safeguard Public Law Libraries
Jonathan C. Stock, Southern New England Law Librarians Association

Chatting About LibGuides
Tina M. Brooks and Beau Steenken, University of Kentucky Law Library

Trends in Academic Legal Scholarly Communications
Allison C. Reeve, University of Kansas, Wheat Law Library

Considerations for Online Vendor Contract Negotiations
Patricia Schminke, Hunter, Maclean, Exley & Dunn, PC 

Fears and Bad Habits, Be Gone! Tips for Becoming a More Effective Speaker
Carol Watson, University of Georgia

2013 Programming Idea-Share — Curating and Collaborating to Deliver the Content You Need
Julie Pabarja, DLA Piper, 2013 Annual Meeting Program Committee Chair

Licensing Electronic Content: From Fair Use to Escape Clauses, and Everything in Between 
Margaret K. Maes, Legal Information Preservation Alliance, AALL Vendor Liaison; Tracy L. Thompson-Przylucki, New England Law Library Consortium, Inc. 

Are E-books a Part of Your Library?
Jeremy Sullivan, DLA Piper

New AALLNET  The User’s Experience One Year Later
Holly M. Riccio, O'Melveny & Myers LLP, AALLNET Committee Chair


Come with your coffee, pull up a chair, and chat with your colleagues!


Tuesday July 24, 2012 7:30am - 8:15am
HCC-Boylston Street Hallway (level 3)

7:30am

8:00am

8:00am

Exhibitors Meeting
Tuesday July 24, 2012 8:00am - 9:00am
HCC-Room 201

8:30am

H1: AALL Public Policy Update: Connecting Members to AALL's Advocacy Efforts

Target Audience: All law librarians who are interested in information policy and legislative advocacy

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify and have the opportunity to discuss AALL policies on a variety of information and legislative issues that impact the Association and our members.
2) Participants will be able to list the top priorities and activities of the Copyright Committee, Digital Access to Legal Information Committee, Government Relations Committee, and Government Relations Office.

Director of AALL's Government Relations Office, Emily Feltren, will moderate an interactive conversation on AALL’s top policy priorities between the chairs of AALL’s three policy committees – the Copyright Committee, the Digital Access to Legal Information Committee, and the Government Relations Committee. The committee chairs will also report on the past year’s policy accomplishments and present their perspectives on issues likely to emerge in the coming year. This collaborative discussion and update will conclude with the presentation of the prestigious AALL Public Access to Government Information Award and the Robert L. Oakley Advocacy Award.



Tuesday July 24, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 302

8:30am

H2: Early Law Libraries as Historical Documents: Recording the Bookshelves of Long-Ago Lawyers

Target Audience: Special collections librarians, reference librarians, catalogers, collection development librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify six types of evidence for reconstructing the contents of historic lawyers’ libraries.
2) Participants will be able to contribute historic library inventories to LibraryThing for research and collection development.

The contents of early law libraries provide important evidence for legal historians studying individual lawyers, the development of doctrine, and the history of legal publishing. The program will first examine the historical study of individual law libraries: how to analyze a library as a historical document, how to reconstruct a library, and why it is a powerful and useful collection development tool. Next, the program will demonstrate LibraryThing’s “Libraries of Early America” project: how this free and open-access database enables the aggregation and comparison of holdings from many early libraries; how the project enables the study of libraries from broad geographic areas, time periods, and professions; how law librarians can add information on historical law libraries; and opportunities for developing new tools.


Organizers/Presenters
JB

Jeremy B. Dibbell

I'm the Librarian for Rare Books and Social Media at LibraryThing.com, where I manage the Libraries of Early America project (reconstructing the libraries of early Americans). I'm also working on a history of the book in Bermuda.


Tuesday July 24, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 312

8:30am

H3: You CAN Handle the Truth: Using Pop Culture to Teach Legal Research

Target Audience: Legal research teachers, whether beginning, advanced, or subject-specific

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to create and implement lessons that make more effective and appropriate use of pop culture references to teach legal research.
2) Participants will be able to explain the pedagogical advantages of using pop culture and humor in the classroom.

“I’m Just a Bill.” Marcia Clark being schooled during the OJ trial for not Shepardizing. Pop culture is full of examples of legal research, but the value such examples actually add to our lessons is rarely assessed. The program speakers will begin with a discussion of the pedagogical support for using culturally familiar characters and settings in the classroom, and then provide examples and demonstrate best practices for prepping and integrating video clips, songs, comics, and other pop culture references into a legal research lesson. These best practices include selection of references familiar to the audience and use of technology to prepare and deliver the lessons. The speakers will also discuss their experiences using pop culture and how to avoid potential risks when implementing this technique in the classroom. Lastly, this session will also address how using pop culture and humor can humanize teachers to students, encourage student participation in what many see as a “boring” class, and foster collaboration among instructors.



Tuesday July 24, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 304

8:30am

H4: Walking the Tight Rope Between Licensed Data Access and Restrictions

Target Audience: All librarians who have a role in managing the use of licensed digital data

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify issues and possible conflicts between how digital data users want to use data and how digital data is licensed to be used.
2) Participants will be able to design ways to inform users of permissible uses and to "monitor" the use of digital data.

While vendor contracts are getting more complex, the use of licensed digital data has become even more restrictive. Digital data is the vendor’s property, which it licenses to subscribers. Licensed data in our highly electronic library workplace makes compliance tricky. This program will elaborate on how to comply with restrictions on the use of licensed data, how to notify and instruct users on restrictions of use, and how a library can monitor the actual uses.



Tuesday July 24, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 210

8:30am

H5: Debating U.S. Policy for the International Criminal Court: Advising the Next Administration

Target Audience: Foreign and international law librarians and those interested in current issues in international law

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to summarize the legal and policy arguments for and against the involvement of the United States with the International Criminal Court.
2) Participants will be able to identify the source materials relating to U.S. policy regarding the International Criminal Court.

The International Criminal Court represents a major development in International Criminal Law. On July 17, 1998, 120 states adopted the Rome Statute as the legal basis for the court. The Rome Statute entered into force on July 1, 2002, after ratification by 60 countries. Currently, the statute has received 117 ratifications. Despite this development, three administrations have kept the United States outside the court. This program will debate the future of U.S. policy regarding the International Criminal Court and whether a policy change is necessary.



Tuesday July 24, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 306

8:30am

H6: The Librarian as Author: AALL/LexisNexis Call for Papers

Come meet the award-winning authors of the 2012 AALL/LexisNexis Call for Papers competition. Hear the authors discuss how they chose their topics, researched and wrote their articles, got past writer's block, juggled the challenges of writing while working 8-5, and other topics. Hear the words of successful writers and be inspired!


Organizers/Presenters
JL

Jennifer Lentz

Head of Collection Development, UCLA Law Library
AR

Anna Russell

Anna is a Reference and Electronic Resources librarian at the University of San Diego Law School since 2011. Her particular interest is in electronic legal resource authentication, preservation, and sharing. She enjoys working with patrons to seek out legal data from the online environment. In the rapidly changing age of digital information, Anna seeks to provide patrons with the most efficient tips and fun tools for online legal research.


Tuesday July 24, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 311

8:30am

OBS-SIS Program: Researchers Roundtable

Target Audience: Librarians who are interested in research; technical services librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to navigate institutional review board procedures.
2) Participants will have written research plans specific to their interests.

Conducting research related to law library technical services is a growing area of interest. This program focuses on empirical and social-based research related to technical services functions. Speakers will present on recent research projects and outline steps for working with institutional review boards to get research related to human subjects approved. The session will end with a research workshop. In this workshop, more experienced researchers will be paired with novices to consult about research ideas and plans.


Organizers/Presenters

Tuesday July 24, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 204

8:30am

RIPS-SIS Program: Riding Solo: Legal Research Competencies for the Solo Practitioner

Target Audience: All librarians involved in legal research instruction

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify unique legal research needs of students who intend to start a solo law practice upon graduation.
2) Participants will be prepared to plan and execute effective lessons focused on the research needs of solo practitioners.

The number of law school graduates who start solo practices has grown substantially in recent years. For the law school class of 2008, NALP reported that 3.3 percent of these graduates were working as solo practitioners. For the class of 2010, that number soared to 5.7 percent of reporting graduates. With increasing numbers of law students entering solo practice, legal research instruction must address economically realistic options for conducting comprehensive legal research. This program will address the trends of students entering solo practice, and law librarian panelists will discuss how these changes influence legal research instruction at their institutions. In addition, panelists will present ideas and examples of lesson plans focused on introducing students to research without the use of expensive legal research databases.



Tuesday July 24, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 208

9:00am

Placement Office

The AALL Placement Committee is proud to offer online job and candidate searching as part of the Placement Office at the AALL Annual Meeting and Conference in Boston. Posting through the AALL Career Center offers many benefits to employers and job seekers. Best of all, you don't have to be in Boston for the AALL Conference, and you don't even have to be in the Placement Office to take part in the action!

http://www.aallnet.org/conference/more/placement-services


Tuesday July 24, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
Sheraton-The Fens

9:00am

10:15am

RIPS-SIS Program: What Were They Thinking and Where Do I Find It?: Strategies for Starting Legislative History Research

Target Audience: Reference librarians who assist patrons in locating federal legislative history documents; librarians and legal research instructors who are interested in learning about how legislative history research is efficiently, yet effectively, facilitated in a variety of library environments

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify specific strategies and resources to employ in different types of library environments to assist patrons in beginning legislative history research.
2) Participants will be able to assess the benefits and limitations of particular print and electronic resources, as such resources relate to finding evidence of legislative intent.

A law library patron walks up to the reference desk and says: “I have this statute, and I need find out why Congress passed it.” What is a reference librarian to do? Depending on the library, and perhaps the particular patron, the answer may be to consult a print index to a collection of government documents in microform. In another library, there may be compiled legislative histories in print or electronic format that can meet the patron’s needs. Still, elsewhere, a database may serve as a one-stop shop for searching and retrieving committee reports and hearings and legislative debates. The panel will engage in a role-play and roundtable discussion on how law librarians from various types of institutions can quickly, yet thoroughly, utilize available resources to help patrons find the materials that just may answer the question: “What were they thinking?”



Tuesday July 24, 2012 10:15am - 11:15am
HCC-Room 208

10:15am

I1: Reasonable Minds Will Differ: So Why Not Work Together to Resolve Conflict?

Target Audience: All AALL members

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify the real interests that lie at the heart of conflict.
2) Participants will be able to generate creative options to resolve conflict.

This interactive program offers an introduction to interest-based negotiation. University of Richmond law professor and former law school dean, John Douglass, will teach participants about the basic skills of problem solving, negotiation, and dispute resolution. Through a series of skits, role plays, and real-life examples, participants will identify the real interests that lie at the heart of conflict, generate creative options to resolve conflict, seek and use information that leads to more satisfactory resolutions, and deal with emotional issues that can sidetrack effective communication. These valuable lessons can be tried at home, on the job, and within professional associations as well. These timely lessons may be particularly beneficial to associations when they are increasingly asked to confront hotly contested issues and members struggle to reach meetings of the minds.


Organizers/Presenters
JD

John Douglass

John Douglass, Professor of Law and former law school dean at the University of Richmond has taught litigation skills and trial advocacy, among other courses. Douglass serves as a mediator of commercial disputes through the McCammon Group in Richmond. He has been a faculty member of the Virginia State Bar’s Course in Professionalism, an instructor in trial advocacy and other litigation skills for the National Institute for Trial Advocacy... Read More →


Tuesday July 24, 2012 10:15am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 302

10:15am

I2: Cool Tools Cafe

Target Audience: Librarians who want to become more comfortable with technology and learn about easily adoptable tools that can be used to improve library websites, marketing, services, or instruction sessions

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify and compare technologies that libraries across the country have implemented to improve library services.
2) Participants will be able to select and implement technologies appropriate to their libraries.

It can be hard to keep up with the constant changes in the world of information technology, tools, gadgets, and apps. During this session, visit stations of tech-savvy librarians who will perform short demos of a myriad of available technologies that they have implemented in libraries of all kinds and sizes. There are tools to help with marketing, sharing information, citation, personal productivity, research, and teaching. These emerging technologies come in the shape of browser add-ons, software, mobile apps, and web 2.0 tools.


Organizers/Presenters

Tuesday July 24, 2012 10:15am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 309

10:15am

I3: Right to Be Lost: Comparative Law Approaches to Internet Privacy and Personal Data Protection

Target Audience: International law research and information specialists, who in the course of their duties, need to identify major sources of legislation, information, and research trends in the area of discussion

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will compare major research centers, identify scholars in the field of Internet privacy, and analyze major areas of academic research and interest in regard to protection of personal identifiable (PI) information online.
2) Participants will be able to summarize all major research and legislative developments in the United States and European Union on issues of privacy protection online, and will be able to compare and assess U.S. and European approaches to the problem.

The Law Library of Congress will host an interactive roundtable discussion that will highlight U.S. and European approaches toward various legal problems associated with protection and preservation of personal information submitted online. Academics and practitioners will analyze existing laws, regulations, and policies in the United States and abroad, and compare methods of regulating the usage of personal information online, assess the safety of Internet searches, and review the possibility to remain anonymous behind an IP address. The session speakers will conduct a case study examining major scholarly and legislative developments in the United States and Western Europe in the field of personal online information protection, and they will debate the adequacy of privacy measures proposed by the U.S. Congress and FTC in comparison with European Union directives that provide for broader co-regulation by interested parties. Privacy protection policies formulated in landmark court decisions and specifics of data protection in varied countries will be examined and presented in a form of a debate between proponents of U.S. and European approaches.


Organizers/Presenters
WH

Woodrow Hartzog

Woodrow Hartzog is an Assistant Professor at the Cumberland School of Law at Samford University. He is also an Affiliate Scholar at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. His research focuses on privacy, human-computer interaction, online communication, and electronic agreements. He holds a Ph.D. in mass communication from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, an LL.M. in intellectual property from the George... Read More →


Tuesday July 24, 2012 10:15am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 306

10:15am

I4: Pruning the Collection, Growing Services: What’s New in Your Library?

Target Audience: Librarians interested in discovering new collection management techniques and developing innovative client services

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will gain ideas for implementing new library services.
2) Participants will be able to compare how other libraries are changing their collection development standards with their own practices.

The twin pressures of budget restrictions and increasing demand for services have inspired many creative responses from law librarians. Librarians will benefit from sharing their best practices and experiences with each other. This session will use the “fishbowl technique” to engage audience members in a discussion of innovative practices being implemented at their own libraries. The moderators will facilitate an ongoing conversation among 4-6 rotating participants from the audience and encourage questions from the audience, as well.



Tuesday July 24, 2012 10:15am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 304

10:15am

I5: Hot Topic: What You Don’t Know Can Hurt You: An Overview of Social Media Legal Issues and a Deep Dive Into Social Media in the Workplace

Target Audience: Anyone who wants an overview of the wide range of contexts in which social media law arises (attorney professional conduct, health law, securities law, marketing and adverting, and family law, to name a few), as well as those who want to understand permissible and impermissible social media uses by employees, according to the latest guidance from the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), including a  run-down of non-NLRB case law involving social media and employers/employees

 

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will get an overview of the numerous areas of law touched by social media and the thorny issues created for companies, regulators, and courts. 

2) Participants will learn the many ways employees (rank and file, managers, and C-level executives) have used social media with (often) unintended negative consequences, and what employers can do about it. They will learn the factors established by the NLRB that identify (or nullify) a violation of the National Labor Relations Act, based on an employee’s use of social media.

 

A Twitter-happy chief financial officer is relieved of his duties after too many tweets about company business. The Wall Street Journal writes an article on the CFO and quotes his tweets in the paper. The company’s stock drops. A Michigan medical technician is fired after posting on Facebook that she hoped a “cop killer” she worked on that day “rotted in hell.” 

 

Social media legal issues come into play in these areas and more: intellectual property (a blogger or employee uses your company logo on a blog—how do you protect your trademark, your brand?), courtroom/litigation issues (can a judge friend a lawyer, can an attorney have a third party “friend” a juror?), family law (use of social media photographs and postings in divorce, child custody cases), securities law (a Facebook entry from a C-level employee posts: “Can’t wait to get back from Bentonville, Ark. tomorrow with the team – fingers crossed that we can pull this off!” Given that Wal-Mart is headquartered in Bentonville, is the C-level employee spilling inside information about an upcoming merger?), health law (can doctors demand that patients sign a release prior to treatment promising not to review the doctor on a site such as Angie’s List?).  

 

An emerging body of social media law does exist, and a number of federal agencies (FTC, NLRB, SEC, EEOC and perhaps soon the FDA), as well as state attorneys general, are enforcing with increasing gusto. The National Labor Relations Board has adopted a policy that every social media case be referred to Washington, to assure uniformity in the board’s approach to the emerging issue, and says that every NLRB regional office in the country is handling at least one social media-related case. What are the standards when employees post social media messages about work while off duty, on their own computers, in their own homes? How are courts ruling? What can employers do? What should a social media policy say? You’ll learn all this and more in a session on social media, with a special emphasis on social media issues in the workplace.


Organizers/Presenters

Tuesday July 24, 2012 10:15am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 311

10:15am

I6: Embedding Librarians to Add Value to Your Institution

Target Audience: Librarians in all types of law libraries who are interested in expanding their current roles within their organizations in areas outside of the library; librarians who may be charged with additional responsibilities within their parent organization

Learning Outcomes:
1)  Participants will be able to identify new and different ways they can use their existing skills to find innovative opportunities within their organizations.
2)  Participants will learn how law libraries can implement embedded librarian programs, and identify strategies for creating an embedded librarian program specific to their own organization’s needs.

More and more, librarians are thinking outside the library and discovering that expanding their traditional roles can make them more valuable to their parent organizations.  Embedded librarian programs have unique relevance for law libraries, and they can look very different depending on the type of organization they serve.  This program will give three different perspectives on utilizing embedded librarians to improve the interaction between librarians, faculty, attorneys, and other library users in academic, law firm, and government law libraries. The panelists will impart how organizations benefit from these programs and what elements are needed to implement a successful program. The presentations will be followed by guided roundtable discussions specific to the types of law library in order to explore the challenges and possibilities of launching an embedded librarian program.


Organizers/Presenters

Tuesday July 24, 2012 10:15am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 210

10:15am

OBS-SIS Program: User Groups on RDA

Target Audience: OBS/TS-SIS members, and other interested law librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify problems involved with the implementation of the new RDA standards.
2) Participants will be able to describe solutions provided by ALEPH, INMAGIC, SOFTLINK, SYRSI/DYNIX, and VOYAGERS for mixing AACR2 and RDA records.

Libraries need better automation to improve the delivery of services to their communities. This session provides an opportunity for ALEPH, INMAGIC, SOFTLINK, SYRSI/DYNIX, and VOYAGERS users to discuss emerging issues, such as the implementation of the RDA standards. During this forum, participants will find solutions to automation challenges and learn from their colleagues as well.


Organizers/Presenters

Tuesday July 24, 2012 10:15am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 207

11:00am

12:00pm

Boston Athenaeum (12:00 p.m. tour)

***This tour has reached capacity.***

$5.00 donation per person required.

Transportation: Attendees should arrange their own transportation; conference volunteers will be available to guide the groups using public transportation.

Founded in 1807, the Boston Athenaeum is a private membership library and cultural center. John Quincy Adams, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Lydia Maria Child, and many other New England luminaries were members of the Athenaeum. Located in the heart of downtown Boston, steps from Boston Common and the State House, the Athenaeum is a fabulous retreat; this tour will feature glimpses of its large and rich collection including rare books, art, sculpture, and prints.

There is no charge for this tour, but advance registration is required.


Tuesday July 24, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Boston Athenaeum

12:00pm

Association Luncheon (sponsored by LexisNexis)

Back by popular demand! Join your colleagues for a celebratory luncheon following three days of stimulating programs, exhibit hall exploration, and networking. Don't miss the opportunity to honor those being awarded for their outstanding contributions to law librarianship and the presentation of the prestigious Marian Gould Gallagher Distinguished Service Award. Highlighting this special event will be keynote speaker Karen McCullough.

Change Is Good…You Go First

"It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change."

- Charles Darwin

 

Karen McCullough admits that she loves change. She believes that enduring success is the combination of talent, attitude, relationship building, – and most importantly, the ability to adapt and change. Achieving your goals requires the honesty to identify what it is that needs to change and then executing a strategy to make it happen. Change is happening at a rapid pace in all law libraries – how will you respond? What can you do to communicate your value and re-engineer your work environment to meet the challenge? McCullough sets the course to find and deliver a strong vision in a high-change environment. Whether your natural instinct is to embrace change or to run from it, this program is for you!

Ticketed event: $20 for those who purchase a Conference Registration or Tuesday Per-Day Registration; $40 for guests. Be sure to register by June 29 - only a limited number of tickets will be available for purchase onsite. Guest tickets are also available for purchase.


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Karen McCullough

Karen McCullough

Karen McCullough & Co.
Thanks for clicking. I am Karen McCullough and I call myself a branding expert (I worked with branding guru Ralph Lauren), a social media enthusiast (I tweet a bunch, do video blogs, love selfies) and I an a Mellennial/ Gen Y Evangelist (I see the future and it's them) | In 2010 I wrote a book with her daughter Meredith (The Seven Women Project) and it's still hot...so we are building a multi-generational SWP online community. | I... Read More →


Tuesday July 24, 2012 12:00pm - 1:30pm
HCC-Ballroom

1:30pm

2:00pm

Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP Law Library

Transportation: Firm is within walking distance; conference volunteers will be available to guide the group.

Edwards Wildman is a major law firm with 650 attorneys based in 14 offices on 3 continents. Located in a landmark office building steps away from the Sheraton Boston Hotel, this firm library offers a glimpse at how law librarians are supporting 21st-century law practice.

There is no charge for this tour, but advance registration by June 29 is required.


Tuesday July 24, 2012 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP Law Library

2:00pm

Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP Law Library

Transportation: Firm is within walking distance; conference volunteers will be available to guide the group. 

Edwards Wildman is a major law firm with 650 attorneys based in 14 offices on 3 continents. Located in a landmark office building steps away from the Sheraton Boston Hotel, this firm library offers a glimpse at how law librarians are supporting 21st-century law practice.

There is no charge for this tour, but advance registration by June 29 is required.


Tuesday July 24, 2012 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP Law Library

2:00pm

Boston Athenaeum (2:00 p.m. tour)

***This tour has reached capacity.***

$5.00 donation per person required.

Transportation: Attendees should arrange their own transportation; conference volunteers will be available to guide the groups using public transportation.

Founded in 1807, the Boston Athenaeum is a private membership library and cultural center. John Quincy Adams, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Lydia Maria Child, and many other New England luminaries were members of the Athenaeum. Located in the heart of downtown Boston, steps from Boston Common and the State House, the Athenaeum is a fabulous retreat; this tour will feature glimpses of its large and rich collection including rare books, art, sculpture, and prints.

There is no charge for this tour, but advance registration is required.


Tuesday July 24, 2012 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Boston Athenaeum

2:00pm

Boston Athenaeum (2:00 p.m. tour)

***This tour has reached capacity.***

$5.00 donation per person required.

Transportation: Attendees should arrange their own transportation; conference volunteers will be available to guide the groups using public transportation.

Founded in 1807, the Boston Athenaeum is a private membership library and cultural center. John Quincy Adams, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Lydia Maria Child, and many other New England luminaries were members of the Athenaeum. Located in the heart of downtown Boston, steps from Boston Common and the State House, the Athenaeum is a fabulous retreat; this tour will feature glimpses of its large and rich collection including rare books, art, sculpture, and prints.

There is no charge for this tour, but advance registration by June 29 is required.


Tuesday July 24, 2012 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Boston Athenaeum

2:30pm

J1: Asking Hard Questions: Teaching Through Questions and Controversy

Target Audience: Librarians who teach, whether the instruction is in the form of a library workshop, bibliographic instruction, or a for-credit legal research course.

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to question students effectively in the classroom and encourage learning on a variety of levels.
2) Participants will be able to use controversial subjects to engage students in legal research on cutting-edge areas of the law.

The hardest questions don’t always have easy answers. Legal research instructors need to ask hard questions—covering content, assessing student understanding, and moving instruction forward. Bloom’s Taxonomy provides a basis for instructors to consider as they develop questions for their students. The speakers in this program will describe effective questioning strategies in light of Bloom’s Taxonomy and demonstrate how to ask effective questions. Audience members will participate in a brief discussion of high-interest—and often controversial—subjects and how to use them to raise student interest when teaching.


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Michael  Robak

Michael Robak

Associate Law Library Director, The University of Missouri-Kansas City
Michael Robak received his J.D. from Robert H. McKinney School of Law and a Masters in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois. Michael began his career as a deputy prosecutor in Indianapolis and subsequently held a number of administrative positions including Marion County Court Administrator. After that he worked as a private practitioner in large and small firm settings as well as his own solo practice. In 2000 he... Read More →


Tuesday July 24, 2012 2:30pm - 3:15pm
HCC-Room 302

2:30pm

J2: Paper Sources, Electronic Sources, and Platform Choices: Training Practicing Attorneys on What to Use When

Target Audience: Law firm librarians; faculty services librarians; anyone training experienced attorneys

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to understand how to articulate and present best practices in cross-platform research.
2) Participants will be able to acquire the tools for presenting information to a seasoned group of attorneys, helping them adapt to a changing mix of legal resources.

As more and more resources move online, many experienced attorneys wonder: When should you still use print resources, and when should you use electronic ones? Are there best practices for when to use each in the research process? Librarians have an opportunity to help these attorneys, many of whom graduated from law school before the digital revolution, by hosting a review of how to use print and online resources together in a strategic way to accomplish research goals. Learn about one law firm’s experience in presenting cross-platform research training to a mixed-generation group of attorneys, and review the best practices they developed for when to use each kind of resource. You’ll also get tips on how to present information to an experienced audience of professionals from a vendor representative.



Tuesday July 24, 2012 2:30pm - 3:15pm
HCC-Room 210

2:30pm

J3: TurboForm Powers – Activate! Creating and Maintaining Online Dynamic Legal Forms

Target Audience: Public law librarians who work with self-represented litigants

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify important factors to consider in the development and design of online dynamic legal forms.
2) Participants will receive coaching on how to navigate and address political issues surrounding the creation of dynamic legal forms.

Online intelligent legal forms are the future of form delivery for self-represented litigants. However, developing such forms can be labor intensive and complex. If your state or county court is considering developing online dynamic legal forms, you will want to learn from first adopters about what works well and what doesn’t, as well as how TurboForms will impact all public law librarians. Speakers will address the creation of a vendor-supported and fee-based system implemented state-wide in Arizona (TurboCourt), as well as a large metropolitan county court’s home-grown and free system (eCourt in Maricopa County), which is used by select other county court systems in the same state.



Tuesday July 24, 2012 2:30pm - 3:15pm
HCC-Room 306

2:30pm

J4: What Makes a Librarian Worth a Million Bucks? Valuing Staff, Resources, and Services When Dollars Are Scarce

This session will be webcast from Boston on AALL2go (member login required).

Target Audience: Library managers from all types of libraries involved with the budgeting process

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to design and conduct a numbers-based evaluation of library staff, online and print resources, and services when considering budget cuts.
2) Participants will be able to analyze the value of staff, resources, and services, and then demonstrate how that value affects the institutional budget – thus, proving the true worth of librarians.

Librarians are frequently faced with budget cuts and stymied when needing more staff and resources to provide adequate services. Libraries are often targeted for reduction because management believes everything is online, and librarians fail to document needs with hard numbers. This program will show you how to compute the value of library staff, how to compare the cost and use of online research services, how to determine which services can be eliminated, and how to create more value for the law library. The speakers will demonstrate how to obtain the numbers needed to improve long-range planning and financial management, and will discuss how to use these measurements to proactively influence decision-makers.


Organizers/Presenters

Tuesday July 24, 2012 2:30pm - 3:15pm
HCC-Room 304

2:30pm

J5: Class KIA-KIX: A Revolutionary New Classification Schedule for the 21st Century

Target Audience: All librarians who work at institutions with collections on indigenous law of the Americas

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to explain the structure and philosophy of the new indigenous law schedules.
2) Participants will be able to locate indigenous law topics in the new Library of Congress Portal for reference and resource classification.

Dr. Jolande Goldberg is working on the newest Library of Congress (LC) schedule, Law of the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas (Classes KIA-KIX), which is expected to be completed prior to July 2012. Throughout the schedule are links to primary sources in indigenous law. She will show how the indigenous law schedule can be utilized via ClassWeb, to support not just cataloging activities, but also collection development and reference services in exciting new ways. George Prager will then discuss his work at LC, reclassifying relevant parts of the collection into the new schedule.



Tuesday July 24, 2012 2:30pm - 3:15pm
HCC-Room 311

2:30pm

J6: Amping Up Library Orientation

Target Audience: Academic librarians or others who regularly welcome new patrons

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to compare different approaches in providing an orientation to the law school library.
2) Participants will able to locate resources on how to develop their own orientation activities.

Library orientation is always difficult: How do you get your patrons to learn about the library, while keeping them engaged? How do you introduce research to students who are more worried about getting their parking pass and financial aid figured out? How do you connect with new associates in a meaningful way so that they feel comfortable approaching you in the future?

Arming your librarians with different strategies for engagement is key to a successful orientation – and a valued library. From Battledecks-style presentations to balloon towers in the reading room, this presentation will provide in-class and in-library activities you can use to get to know your students and get them to know your library. It will also explore how to reach students through virtual tours using Prezi, creating videos to personalize the library, and other ways to include orientation activities in your library’s online presence. Law firms present their own challenges when it comes to associate, paralegal, and staff orientations. This presentation will also draw from experiences conducting orientations in a large law firm setting and demonstrate how early engagement leads to more valued firm librarians and firm libraries.


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Ashley Moye

Ashley Moye

In a former life, I was a statistician snubbing her future as an actuary and instead working on her graduate degree in applied mathematics... Until I realized that I hated teaching math, that is. After a bit of soul searching and fondly remembering my childhood dreams, I ended up enrolled in the MLIS program at UNC Greensboro and haven't looked back since. | | I serve as the Metadata & Serials Librarian at the Charlotte School of Law... Read More →


Tuesday July 24, 2012 2:30pm - 3:15pm
HCC-Room 312

3:30pm

3:45pm

K1: Don't Want to Be All by Myself: Federal Courts and Pro Ses

Target Audience: Librarians who provide services to pro ses or are interested in providing access to the courts

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to explain two examples of model programs to their stakeholders.
2) Participants will be able to compare federal, state, and county programs that assist self-represented litigants.

Federal courts assistance to self-represented litigants is relatively recent compared to efforts at state and county levels. This program will look at self-represented litigants in the federal courts, with an in-depth look at two pilot district court clerk’s office projects: the Pro Se Assistance Program in the Northern District of Illinois, which provides basic legal information and contacts with pro bono attorneys, and the Pro Se Pathfinder in the District of New Jersey, which is an electronic resource to help people determine whether they are eligible for bankruptcy and helps complete basic forms. Comparisons with state and county efforts will be made.


Organizers/Presenters
JJ

James J. Waldron

I have been the Clerk of the Bankruptcy Court in New Jersey for almost 28 years. Before that I worked with the Administrative Office of the US Courts and administered the procurement and management of the Federal Judiciary's law book program.


Tuesday July 24, 2012 3:45pm - 4:45pm
HCC-Room 210

3:45pm

K2: Building the Law Library of Congress Web Presence – A Collaborative Approach

Target Audience: All AALL members interested in participating in the development of a portal to and repository of local, state, national, tribal, international, and transnational legislative information

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to summarize the relationship of collecting and making accessible digital content through the Law Library of Congress website, and the Law Library’s ongoing mission to collect and preserve print collections.

2) Participants will be able to interact with Law Library of Congress personnel, articulating options and opportunities for law libraries to collaborate in building a national repository and portal for law and legislation.


AALL supports the Law Library of Congress’s concept, effort to create, and management of Law.gov , a portal to and repository of local, state, tribal, national, international, and transnational legal and legislative information. Law Library representatives will provide an overview of Project ONE at the Library of Congress and the Law.gov access point; updates to THOMAS in 2012 and what's next; possible metadata standards for future search indexing in Law.gov; and future technologies for Law.gov. Emily Feltren, Director of the AALL Government Relations Office, will discuss the federal and state inventories of legal materials. Participants will be asked to provide input on what models for collaboration would be most effective to develop and sustain this exciting initiative.


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Andrew Weber

Andrew Weber

Legislative Information Systems Manager, Library of Congress
Andrew Weber, Legislative Information Systems Manager, has been at the Law Library of Congress since June 2004. He has contributed to reports for Congress, updated parts of The Bluebook, trademarked the GLIN logo, and drafted visa applications for co-workers. He runs the Law Library's Twitter account and Facebook page and works to develop and implement new features for THOMAS. He has been fortunate to blend his love of technology, law, gadgets... Read More →


Tuesday July 24, 2012 3:45pm - 4:45pm
HCC-Room 302

3:45pm

K3: Passing the Baton: Managing Temporary and Permanent Succession Changes

Target Audience: Librarians who need to be aware of succession planning in their departments

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify and list issues, problems, and ramifications involved in successful succession planning.
2) Participants will be able to design and implement a successful succession plan for their departments and libraries.

As the professional and paraprofessional librarian population ages, new members must be recruited, hired, and trained to manage and continue to develop our public and technical services departments and operations. Staff may be retiring, or absent from work for extended periods due to maternity, medical, military, and other leave needs. Regardless of job titles or how jobs may have changed over the years, this program will focus on concerns, issues, and implementation plans as staff retires or takes extended leave and “passes the baton” to newer members of the law library community. How do you recruit and train replacements? How do you seamlessly return to work after an extended absence? What historical information do you impart about institutions and departments so that the library can continue to be responsive to its ever-changing patron community? Program speakers will address technology tools and communications necessary for smoothly managing succession to accommodate retirements and/or planned extended absences. The program will conclude with an interactive discussion among presenters and attendees.



Tuesday July 24, 2012 3:45pm - 4:45pm
HCC-Room 304

3:45pm

K4: Customer Service and Marketing: Shaking Things Up to Achieve a Great Library Identity

Target Audience: Librarians interested in reference and research, client services, access services

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify how to put customer service ideas into action plans while getting library staff buy-in on a new customer service and marketing plan.
2) Participants will be able to list at least three creative ideas on how to shake up their image and create that corporate brand loyalty feeling.

Customer service, image, and marketing are important in gaining loyalty from consumers in the corporate world, but they are just as important in all types of law libraries. While certain companies automatically make you think of great customer service, others can be quite the opposite. Learn how you can create better customer satisfaction and loyalty in your library, while having a little fun along the way. Shake things up, get some new ideas, and put them into action!


Organizers/Presenters
ES

Eileen Santos

Assistant Director for Public Services, Howard University School of Law Library


Tuesday July 24, 2012 3:45pm - 4:45pm
HCC-Room 312

3:45pm

K5: Modeling Subject Authority Data: FRSAD Overview and Implementation Examples

Target Audience: Information technology librarians, technical services librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will glean a comprehensive view of the Functional Requirements for Bibliographical Records (FRBR) family models, especially the third model for subject authority data.
2) Participants will be able to explain how the Functional Requirements for Subject Authority Data (FRSAD) conceptual model can be applied to international and local subject authority data.

The Resource Description and Access (RDA) description standard incorporated the Functional Requirements for Bibliographical Records (FRBR) and Functional Requirements for Authority Data (FRAD) models, with plans to include Functional Requirements for Subject Authority Data (FRSAD) in the near future. This program will use non-technical terminology to provide an overview of all three models and discuss how they may be harmonized to create one comprehensive model. The third model published in June 2011, Functional Requirements for Subject Authority Data (FRSAD), provides a clearly defined, structured frame of reference for relating subject authority records to the needs of the users and to allow for the development of international sharing and data use of subject authority records both within and beyond the library sector.


Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Athena Salaba

Athena Salaba

Associate Professor & Associate Director, Kent State University - SLIS


Tuesday July 24, 2012 3:45pm - 4:45pm
HCC-Room 306

3:45pm

K6: I Have a Patent Number – Now What?

Target Audience: Librarians who have some experience with patent research but need to progress to the advanced level to support their IP practice

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to develop and execute comprehensive investigations on patent post-issuance information to support their IP practice.
2) Participants will be able to better discuss, assess, and execute searches related to patent documents to meet user needs.

Do you have experience with patent information, but lack confidence navigating the complexities of the post-issuance landscape? Join us for this session where the emphasis will be on research skills for post-issuance data, such as constructing a patent family tree, finding related litigation, checking legal status, and determining current ownership. The speakers will detail current tools and resources to help users find this information, as well as discuss the varying vocabulary used to represent these important legal concepts. This session will give a comprehensive answer to the question: “I have a patent number — now, what information can I find from it?”



Tuesday July 24, 2012 3:45pm - 4:45pm
HCC-Room 311

3:45pm

M/AV-SIS Program: Using Creative Commons Licenses

Target Audience: Librarians interested in using Creative Commons content to supplement their fair use of copyrighted materials or to make their own content available to others

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to discuss the differences between the various Creative Commons licenses and the circumstances appropriate to their use.
2) Participants will be able to locate Creative Commons licensed material and explain how to give credit for its use.

A Creative Commons license encourages content sharing, but it works within the boundaries of copyright law. It is an agreement between the copyright holder and the user to affirmatively permit certain kinds of uses. There are several different types of licenses.

This program will explain the pros and cons of licensing your content and using others' licensed content under the various options. It will also explore common repositories of Creative Commons licensed content (e.g., Flickr). Attendees will be given the opportunity to participate in interactive demonstrations and to discuss their own experiences with the need for and/or use of Creative Commons licensed content.


Organizers/Presenters

Tuesday July 24, 2012 3:45pm - 4:45pm
HCC-Room 202

5:00pm

5:00pm

5:00pm

5:00pm